220 VOLT WIRING

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  #1  
Old 02-15-01, 11:12 AM
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I have a 220 volts 20 AMP air compressor, which i need to temporarily wire from my home instead of my garage, (which is being built, and has no electrical outlets at this time).
I was planning to use an un-used stove outlet which is 220 50 amps, (i'm going to replace the breaker to a 20 amp). The problem is: the stove outlet is 4 wires; (one black, one red, one bare ground, one white). I believe the black and the red each have 115 volts in them. The compressor is a 3 wire. Which wire gets left out of the equation to hook up the compressor? I need the compressor to complete the garage!
 
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Old 02-15-01, 06:04 PM
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Between the red and white is 110 v
Between the black and white is 110v
Between the black and red is 220 v
bare wire for grounding to electical box and to the grounding screw of plug (possibly green)

So BLACK AND RED give you 220 v , if the white is not used cap it with an insulator nut. What color is the 3rd wire for the compressor, green is a ground wire.
 
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Old 02-16-01, 06:03 AM
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Your compressor does not use 110v like the stove--so you will only have 3-wires two 110v hots and a ground--no neutral(white).
 
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Old 02-16-01, 12:32 PM
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Thanks for replies, but it didn't work...

Originally posted by dkerr
Between the red and white is 110 v
Between the black and white is 110v
Between the black and red is 220 v
bare wire for grounding to electical box and to the grounding screw of plug (possibly green)

So BLACK AND RED give you 220 v , if the white is not used cap it with an insulator nut. What color is the 3rd wire for the compressor, green is a ground wire.
3 wires off the compressor, black, white, bare ground. I connected the black to the red and black, and the white to the white and the bare wire to the bare wire. I did not connect it to the compressor (did not want to damage compressor until i was sure it was hooked up correctly). I turned on the breaker and it trips.
 
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Old 02-25-01, 10:55 AM
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If you connected the black from the compressor to red and black , you created a dead short, and of course blew the breaker. If you are certain that the compressor is 220 volt and there is no 110 usage here at the compressor, I have to take your word for this. Then black wire from compressor to black , and the white wire from compressor to red, ground to ground. When I said black and red gives you 220 v, I didn't mean you short them together to get 220 v. If only 220v is being used , the white/neutral from the circuit power is not used. White is known in north america as a neutral wire , but if only 220 v is being used at the compressor (no 110 usuage) and if black/white are the only wires coming from the compressor (besides the ground) then logic says they must be the 2 wires used to feed 220v to it.



[Edited by dkerr on 02-25-01 at 01:08]
 
 

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