GFCI and Double rocker issues

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Old 07-28-13, 08:26 PM
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GFCI and Double rocker issues

Hey folks! I am having issues wiring a GFCI outlet and a double rocker switch in the a dual gang box. I followed this diagram perfectly Name:  switch.jpg
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However, L2 (fan) on the switch works, but L1 (light) trips the GFCI. I swapped the load around on the double rocker switch but L2 still works (now light) but L1 (now fan) still trips the GFCI. In both cases, the next box in line (another bathroom light) doesn't work regardless.

Next up, I tried wiring it differently Name:  photo-21.jpg
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I moved the hot line to the common on the double rocker switch, linked common from the switch to the line on the GFCI. I moved the hot neutral wire to the neutral on the GFCI opposite the line. I took the two neutral load wires and plugged them in to the neutral load on the GFCI. Doing this, the outlet works, L1 works, L2 DOES NOT work, and the next item down the line does not work.

What have I missed? Shouldn't the first diagram worked? Located in Oregon, please help!
 

Last edited by Stephen Green; 07-28-13 at 10:42 PM.
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Old 07-28-13, 10:39 PM
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In that diagram it has neutral going into hot side of plug vice versa.here is a correct pic.be sure yours go in on correct sides to start out.
 
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Old 07-28-13, 10:50 PM
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Trotter, I had noticed mine was the reverse of the diagram, but didn't think to mention. As I look at the plugs/switches directly, the line/common side is on the right, the load/neutral side is on the left. In double checking, it appears things are as your diagram indicates. Thanks!
 
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Old 07-28-13, 10:54 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I am having issues wiring a GFCI outlet and a double rocker switch in the a dual gang box. I followed this diagram perfectly... What have I missed? Shouldn't the first diagram worked?
There's no way to tell whether the wiring in your diagram should have worked, for several reasons. First, your GFCI receptacle has two pairs of terminals, marked as LINE and LOAD, and you didn't indicate those in your diagram.
I moved the hot neutral wire to the neutral on the GFCI opposite the line.
The pair of wires bringing the power in from the panel must be connected to the LINE pair of terminals on the GFCI. Black to the "hot" terminal, which should be brass colored and opposite the shorter slot, and white to the "neutral" terminal, which should be silver and opposite the longer slot.

I moved the hot neutral wire to the neutral on the GFCI opposite the line.
There is no "hot neutral." If you mean the "house neutral" or "the neutral in the cable coming from the panel," then the silver LINE terminal is where it needs to be connected. (Note: changing the colors for the terminals on your diagram would help clarify things, for you as well as for us.)

Additional loads feeding off of the GFCI receptacle need to be fed from the LOAD terminals iff the load requires GFCI protection. If the load does not require GFCI protection, the wires for it should be added, in the second wiring slot at each terminal, to the LINE terminals.

I'm guessing this is in a bathroom, since you refer to
the next box in line (another bathroom light)
If so, the lights and fans in bathrooms don't require GFCI protection. They should be fed from the LINE terminals on the GFCI receptacle.

Are there any other loads being fed from the 2-gang switch box? Are there any wires in the box, or cables, other than the power coming in from the panel, the feed going to the light(s) and the feed going to the fan?

It appears, judging from your picture, that you have three 3-wire, 2-conductor cables in the box: One from the panel and one each going to the light(s) and the fan. But there may be four, since you refer to
the next box in line (another bathroom light)
Nothing you've listed, except the GFCI receptacle itself, requires GFCI protection.

If so, terminate the house neutral and a white 12AWG pigtail to the silver LINE terminal. Splice all of the load neutrals to the white pigtails. Terminate the house hot feed and a black 12AWG pigtail to the brass LINE terminal. Splice the black wire going to the second box and a second black pigtail to the first black pigtail,

Terminate the second black pigtail to one of the two terminal screws on the joined pair of terminals on your duplex snitch. Terminate one of the black wires for the two loads to one of the isolated terminals on the switch and the second black load wire to the other isolated terminal. Splice the ground wires together with three pigtails. Use one of the pigtails and a green ground screw to bond the metal box to ground. Terminate the other two ground pigtails to the receptacle and the switch.

I followed this diagram perfectly
The diagram to follow is the one printed on the box the GFCI came in.
 
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Old 07-28-13, 11:24 PM
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As I look at the plugs/switches directly, the line/common side is on the right, the load/neutral side is on the left.
Some terminology:

A plug is the thing with prongs on the end of a cord. The device it plugs into is a receptacle. Your GFCI receptacle and your switch are built differently, and the wires connect to them in different places. There is no left or right on a receptacle or a switch since there is no specified orientation for mounting them. The is no common in an AC electrical system - there are hot, neutral and ground.

The neutral terminals are on one side of a receptacle and the "hot" terminals are on the other side. The LINE terminals are on one end of a GFCI receptacle and the LOAD terminals are on the other end.

Some receptacles and other devices have common terminals, in which two screw terminals are joined by a tab that can be broken off to isolate them. Your duplex switch should have one of those for the power coming into it.

"Line/common" is not an equation, since there is no common conductor and "line" refers to unswitched power from the panel. "Load/neutral" is not an equation either. "Load" refers to any attached appliance that uses electricity, and "neutral" is shorthand for "the grounded conductor."

A copy of Wiring Simplified, which you can buy for less than $15, will help you understand not only how electrical systems are connected, but why they're done the way they are.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 07-29-13 at 07:58 AM. Reason: Add link
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Old 07-29-13, 12:16 AM
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Nashkat1

Thanks for the reply and the knowledge. I will spend some time on this first thing tomorrow and get back with how things worked. I appreciate your time very much!

Thanks,

Steve
 
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