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Estimating an install of 40A 240V outlet in Garage of townhouse.

Estimating an install of 40A 240V outlet in Garage of townhouse.

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  #1  
Old 08-03-13, 03:17 PM
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Estimating an install of 40A 240V outlet in Garage of townhouse.

I am interested in purchasing an electric vehicle but don't know if the charging station will make it cost prohibitive.

Amazon.com: Nissan LEAF Residential EV Charger, 25' cable (Level 2 EVSE-RS: 7.2kW, 30A): Automotive

I live in a townhouse that was built in 1998 with what looks like a 100 A service. The GE Panel says Max 125 A. All slots are currently in use so I would need to replace the panel.

I live in a building with 5 town-homes. I am the house next to the end unit that has the meters installed. I assume the cabling between the meter to the panel would be sufficient to add an additional 40A 240V breaker to support the charger.

Also the current panel is on the passenger side when pulling into the garage. I would like the outlet mounted on the driver side and closer to the garage door so I can extend the charger cable to the driveway if parked outside or to the front of the garage if parked indoors.

I don't know if code allows 240V wiring to be run outside the wall (in some sort of conduit) so that there is no routing of cables behind the sheetrock.

Should I give up on the idea of an electric vehicle? Just wondering what potential issues I might have that would drive up the installation cost.

Also wondering what I should expect an electrician to charge for this job.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-03-13, 03:41 PM
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Welcome to the forum.

You may be able to have a sub panel installed next to your main panel. In order to add an additional load to a panel you need to make sure you aren't currently at capacity. Electric cooking, electric heat, air conditioning, electric hot water heating all add up.

The circuit could be run from the panel in EMT (thinwall pipe) with no problems....especially in a garage.

Very hard to price the job without seeing it. Call an electrician...... most of us give free estimates. (No sorry.....you can't call me)
 
  #3  
Old 08-03-13, 03:56 PM
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thanks for the fast info. We have Natural Gas for our range, hot water heater, furnace and clothes dryer. I have replaced all of my lighting with LED bulbs. I do have two electric heaters in the basement that are used in addition to the furnace. They probably get about 20 hours of use per year. I would say the major cause of power consumption comes from our Central Air (on a 40 A Breaker).

Thanks for suggesting the sub panel. It gives me a starting point when asking an electrician.
 
  #4  
Old 08-03-13, 03:58 PM
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It sounds like the additional 40A circuit will not over burden the panel.
 
  #5  
Old 08-03-13, 04:39 PM
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If your panel is rated for tandem breakers and you don't already have tandem breakers you may not need a subpanel. If you remove the cover from your panel you should be able to find a label that gives model number. The pros here can tell you if tandems can be used. Most GE panels can also use half size 2-pole breakers which would be an advantage. A picture of your panel with the cover off might help also. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...-pictures.html
 
  #6  
Old 08-03-13, 07:21 PM
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This is good to know. I will check the panel model. I also found my KW Usage for the past year

Date_______Amt.______KWH______Est./Act.
07/10/2013__$162.27___1,080_______Actual
06/10/2013__$105.41___753________Actual
05/10/2013__$113.39___772________Estimated
04/10/2013__$99.14____673________Actual
03/12/2013__$88.58____592________Actual
02/11/2013__$137.88___921________Estimated
01/10/2013__$132.24___879________Actual
12/07/2012__$49.92____332________Actual
11/08/2012__$123.16___850________Estimated
10/10/2012__$111.34___767________Estimated
09/10/2012__$156.40___1,018_______Actual
08/08/2012__$192.23___1,203_______Actual

On the worst month 1203KWh /30 days = 40.1 KWH per day. I know this is average and we are interested in peeks, but it gives an idea.

If I assume I used the 40 KWh over 8 hours that would be 5KW/Hr.

Then 5000W/120V = 42 Amps each hour.

Wondering if my logic is correct.
 
  #7  
Old 08-03-13, 07:58 PM
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Also wondering what I should expect an electrician to charge for this job.
Why don't you ask a couple and find out? The electrician can tell you if your panel will take tandem breakers and can also tell you if a subpanel is a viable option.
 
  #8  
Old 08-03-13, 08:16 PM
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This is a simple DIY job if you can use tandems. No electrician needed. GE breakers are cheap. Probably cost you less than $50 if you DIY it.
 
  #9  
Old 08-05-13, 05:48 PM
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I found my breaker panel

Ge Electrical 100A Ge Loadcenter TM1210CCU - Amazon.com

TLM12BC / TLM1212CCU

If this does accept tandems, that would be great. I would love to just do it myself. The only thing that makes me nervous is that there is no main breaker installed at the top. I know that even with a main breaker it is still live on the terminals when shut off but it seems I have no protection (unless there is a main breaker switch outside where the meters are).
 
  #10  
Old 08-05-13, 05:56 PM
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Simple or not it may not be legal in the OPs area especially in a multifamily dwelling. I'd be willing to bet a licensed electrician is required for permit and HOA authorization
 
  #11  
Old 08-05-13, 06:10 PM
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Yes, especially in New Jersy. I missed the N.J. and multi family when I answered.
 
  #12  
Old 08-05-13, 06:31 PM
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Oh well, that's the cost of living in a townhouse. Thanks everyone for all of the info. I will now go get some estimates.
 
  #13  
Old 08-05-13, 06:44 PM
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I found my breaker panel

Ge Electrical 100A Ge Loadcenter TM1210CCU - Amazon.com

TLM12BC / TLM1212CCU

If this does accept tandems, that would be great. I would love to just do it myself. The only thing that makes me nervous is that there is no main breaker installed at the top. I know that even with a main breaker it is still live on the terminals when shut off but it seems I have no protection (unless there is a main breaker switch outside where the meters are).

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz2b936KNEU
GE doesn't make or use tandem breakers, they use full 1" thick Type THQL breakers or 1/2" thin Type THQP breakers. The panel you linked to will accept either 12 - THQL breakers or 24 - THQP breakers. What do you have now? As was already mentioned, you may not be able to do the work yourself, but you can be prepared with what to ask an electrician. Your existing GE panel has copper bus. If it had been an older aluminum bus panel, I would have suggested replacing it.
 
  #14  
Old 08-06-13, 10:51 AM
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Joe - Thanks. That was the last piece of info I was looking for. My panel is completely full of the 1/2" breakers (22) Plus one double 1" 240V for the Central Air. So I should expect them to estimate at a minimum some sort of sub panel.
 
  #15  
Old 08-06-13, 07:42 PM
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So I should expect them to estimate at a minimum some sort of sub panel.
Yep, I would suggest maybe a 12 to 16 space subpanel and move 8 of the thin Type THQP breakers with single pole circuits to the new sub to free up 2 - 1" spaces for a 2 pole 30 amp Type THQL (full sized) breaker for the charger and 2 - 1" spaces for possibly a 2 pole 60 amp Type THQL (full sized) breaker to feed the new subpanel. Keep those two heavier loads in the main panel.
 
  #16  
Old 08-29-13, 05:21 PM
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I finally got a estimate for the job. I ended up setting on having two outlets installed. One outlet will be next to the panel and the other outside.

I am scheduling a visit sometime next week to discuss the details.

I was hoping to gather some additional information on the outdoor receptacle. Are there any good outdoor receptacles with weather protection that folks suggest? Any rated for 240V 30A or will I have to go for something lower like 240V 20A. Google searches weren't bringing up much so I am assuming I am going to have some difficulties on this.
 
  #17  
Old 08-29-13, 06:03 PM
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It isn't so much the receptacle as the cover. You want an in use cover not a protective flap.



Actual design will vary. Some will have the receptacle facing down.
 
  #18  
Old 08-29-13, 06:50 PM
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Interesting. Thanks. (need to enter more characters or this will not post)
 
  #19  
Old 08-29-13, 07:19 PM
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It isn't so much the receptacle as the cover. You want an in use cover not a protective flap.
But....standard non-locking straight blade receptacles in 120 and 250 volt configurations are required to be listed weather-resistant type.
 
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