Troubleshooting wired light switch

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  #1  
Old 08-06-13, 07:24 PM
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Troubleshooting wired light switch

I have a light switch in my master bedroom that controls an outlet on the same wall. Everything here worked great. At some point I swapped the old grungy switch and outlet for new, cleaner versions. What I have recently noticed that neither the outlet or switch seem to be working. I've not tried to use the outlet or switch in awhile because I hadn't really had anything to plug into it, so I can't guarantee that it's connected to my swap of a new switch and outlet, but I'm guessing it's connected.

The breaker is fine. And I have ensured that GFCI's are not tripped. The switch next to this one controls the ceiling fan and it is on a GFCI, but I don't know if this switch is. My father-in-law worked with it a bit and used a power meter to which we were able to notice that power was going to the light switch, but the outlet was not receiving power. So, I'm guessing maybe that means the switch somehow is the problem. I just have no idea what to try next. I'm wondering if it is simply a matter of where I attached wires something wrong. Again, these are brand new pieces and I even swapped in another brand new switch and outlet and same problem...so I know it's not the materials. I've included images below. I've tried to provide as much relevant information as I can, but I realize I may have left other details out of which I would be glad to provide more as prompted.

All images are as it appears now:
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0By1m...it?usp=sharing
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0By1m...it?usp=sharing
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0By1m...it?usp=sharing
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0By1m...it?usp=sharing
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0By1m...it?usp=sharing
 
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  #2  
Old 08-06-13, 07:30 PM
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The receptacle shown in the second picture should have a white wire connected to the silver side.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 09:16 PM
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I have ensured that GFCI's are not tripped. The switch next to this one controls the ceiling fan and it is on a GFCI, but I don't know if this switch is.
Bedroom circuits do not require GFCI protection. Since 2008, IIRC, they do require AFCI protection. If the protection is provided by a circuit breaker with a test button, it is almost certainly AFCI.
 
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Old 08-07-13, 07:47 AM
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Since 2008, IIRC, they do require AFCI protection.
Working from memory here, I think AFCI protection for bedroom outlets first appeared in the 2002 NEC to become effective in January 2003. I always thought that strange for the effective date to be a full year after the code was published.
 
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Old 08-07-13, 01:45 PM
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Working from memory here, I think AFCI protection for bedroom outlets first appeared in the 2002 NEC to become effective in January 2003. I always thought that strange for the effective date to be a full year after the code was published.
I think you're right about the dates, Joe.

As for the one-year delay, wasn't there something about allowing some time for the technology to be improved and/or for the manufacturers to get geared up?
 
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Old 08-07-13, 04:31 PM
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IIRC it was in the 99 NEC, but did not take affect til 1/1/2001.
 
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Old 08-07-13, 06:17 PM
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I have a 2002 codebook, I'll check it later if I think about it. I'll have to look and see if I have a 1999 codebook, probably do, but will have to look for it.
 
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Old 08-08-13, 07:12 PM
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I will go back and take a look at that. Are the black wires where they need to be?
 
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Old 08-08-13, 07:44 PM
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Are the black wires where they need to be?
No.
Originally Posted by pcboss
The receptacle shown in the second picture should have a white wire connected to the silver side.
Black wires should only be connected to the brass terminals.

Why are there two black wires there? Is the switch supposed to control only one half of the duplex receptacle, or both halves? Is it supposed to control more than one duplex receptacle?
 
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Old 08-12-13, 08:02 PM
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I honestly don't remember if the switch controlled one plug or two on that receptacle. We didn't use it very long before we moved the whole room around and never had use for the plug before we realized that it stopped working following swapping new receptacles and switches.

I'm pretty sure that those wires are only meant for one receptacle because there is no other receptacle close by other than the cable jack.
 
  #11  
Old 08-12-13, 10:34 PM
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You have a duplex receptacle in that box. It has two receptacles on one yoke. They can be wired as one because the separate terminals for each are connected with metal tabs. They can also be wired separately, usually by removing only the tab on the hot side.

Tell us about each cable and wire in this box and in the switch box and we can help you figure it out.

Do you still have the receptacle you took out?

Plugs are on the ends of cords. The prongs on them are pushed into a receptacle to connect an appliance to a circuit.
 
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