GFCI garage ceiling required..WI

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  #1  
Old 08-13-13, 02:46 PM
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GFCI garage ceiling required..WI

Hello,
I live in Wisconsin and the local code for my garage wiring is requiring a GFCI to be installed on the ceiling of the garage. I installed receptacles/outlets so all I have to do is just plug in any light that has a plug. this way I can hang any shop light anywhere.
The inspector wants me to install a GFCI where I have the first receptacle installed making everyone after that protected. My dilemma is the first receptacle has the lighting wires tucked up inside the box, but not connected to the outlet/receptacle. this outlet is for the garage door opener.
Code is also requiring the garage door opener to have its own circuit.
So what I'm looking at is two sets of wires in one box. Set one is the lights, not hooked up to the outlet. Set two is the garage door opener, hooked up to the outlet.
Both have their own circuit breaker.
What I'm wondering is, is there a way to hook both circuits into the outlet after I change it out to a GFCI?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-13-13, 04:05 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

What I'm wondering is, is there a way to hook both circuits into the outlet after I change it out to a GFCI?
Not that I can think of. GFCIs don't work like regular duplex receptacles. The two receptacles on the GFCI are both part of that device and can't be separated.

Code is also requiring the garage door opener to have its own circuit.
And that's why you can't just tie the lights into the protected side of the GFCI for the GDO.

The receptacles for the lights will need GFCI protection of their own. You could replace the box where the receptacle for the GDO is mounted with a 2-gang box and install a second GFCI receptacle there, or you protect it anywhere upstream. A GFCI breaker in the panel would do it. You could do that for each of these circuits and leave everything in the ceiling the way it is now if you wanted to.

I'm curious: Why are subject to an inspection and upgrade for these circuits?
 
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Old 08-13-13, 04:41 PM
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A ceiling mounted gfi would violate the NEC. It must be readily accessible. Perhaps you area just requires gfi protection, not ceiling mounted?
 
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Old 08-15-13, 03:23 PM
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Hi guys.... OK the reason I need an inspection is because last summer I jacked up the garage and installed longer wall studs and poured a new slab and grade beam. Also added/updated the electrical.
I decided to just add another box next to the box in question and separate the wires from the gdo and lighting. I'll install the new box with a gfci and the other one with a gfci, making two circuits with two gfci outlets protecting.
That make sense?
 
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Old 08-15-13, 04:34 PM
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Sounds good. Be sure to splice both the grounds together and connect to each GFI.
 
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Old 08-16-13, 06:04 PM
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Well everything turned out and the City Building inspector was pleased.

Thanks for your help Guys!
 
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Old 08-16-13, 06:57 PM
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Congrats. Thanks for the feedback.
 
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