220 v wall outlet "floating" in box. how to fix? (pic)


  #1  
Old 08-19-13, 04:17 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 115
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
220 v wall outlet "floating" in box. how to fix? (pic)

I'm sorry I realize that this question should have been posted in the "Electrical - AC & DC". I do not know how to delete this. Could the mods please move or delete. Thank you.

Name:  IMG_7867.jpg
Views: 7363
Size:  41.8 KB

So in my on-going saga of trying to fix everything that the previous home-owners did to this house. I came across this beauty behind the stove.

The 220 V outlet seems not suited for the housing and is secured with only one screw. Its sort of floating in the box with large gaps on either side. I can tell that the steel box in the wall extends further to the left behind the drywall.

What is the easiest way to fix this. Is there a different outlet that I should buy that will fit this box. Or some sort of an adapter or extension.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 08-19-13, 04:33 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 7,458
Upvotes: 0
Received 6 Upvotes on 5 Posts
That receptacle is for the 240V circuit that your range requires. 220V is not available in the US.

What is the easiest way to fix this.
It appears from your picture that the box in the wall may be an 11-B. If so, each edge will be 4-11/16" long, and you can use a cover such as this: MULB 11526 4-11/16 SQ 1/2D RCPT CVR to mount your receptacle to your existing box.

To do that, you will also need to seal the open knockout visible above the receptacle and any other unsealed openings in the box.
 
  #3  
Old 08-19-13, 04:47 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 115
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ah yes! 240V my "roots" are showing

Hi Nashkat1 thanks again! Yes, I measured the box and it is indeed 4-11/16". Perfect, I will order this and the appropriate knockout plugs.

For anyone else, here is what I read about why to seal open knockouts:
"The national electric code says that unused openings in such equipment need to be closed. Covering these openings helps to prevent accidental shocks, helps to prevent hot sparks from escaping if something goes wrong inside the enclosure, and helps to prevent pests from entering. "
 
  #4  
Old 08-19-13, 05:09 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Bill and nealyak, this looks to be a regular double gang receptacle box from where I see the screw inserted into the flange on the receptacle. Take another look to either verify or shoot it down, please.
 
  #5  
Old 08-19-13, 06:15 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,872
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
I don't think so, Chandler. Look at the overall height of the receptacle, it's less than the 4 11/16" height/width of the box Look at the location of the single screw holding the receptacle, that's consistent with the screw location on an 11-B box.

That being said, I think what I would do would be to set the box flush with the surface of the stud and install a 1/2" raised 1-Gang plaster frame.

Frost - RACO 837 4-11/16 INCH SQUARE 1G 1/2" RAISED FIXTURE PLASTER FRAME TILE RING SINGLE DEVICE

Then, patch/repair the drywall around the box. Install the flush range receptacle with a metal plate. Of course, install K.O. closers in the extra knockouts in the box too.

Knockout Hole Plugs, Seals & Reducing Washers | MSCDirect.com
 
  #6  
Old 08-19-13, 06:22 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,100
Received 3,982 Upvotes on 3,574 Posts
On a standard 1900 (4") square box..... the ears are in the corners.

Name:  1900 box.jpg
Views: 4948
Size:  45.8 KB
 
  #7  
Old 08-20-13, 03:27 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Thanks guys. I was just looking at the distance from the corner to the screw center, and it seemed a little too much for an 11-b. It was curiosity more than anything.

Name:  double box.jpg
Views: 1887
Size:  19.0 KB
 
  #8  
Old 08-20-13, 06:28 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 115
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Here is a picture of the box with the drywall cut back. So you can clearly see it is the 11-B box identified by Nashkat1

Name:  IMG_7871.jpg
Views: 3197
Size:  42.3 KB

I got this fits perfectly: Steel City 4 in. x 11/16 in. Square Box Mud RING 1 Device 1/2 Raised - Silver-72C13-25R at The Home Depot

I have two questions:

1. The box is drilled on the left side into the stud. The screws go in at an angle and this puts the entire box at an angle with respect to the face of the wall. The screwed side is deeper in the wall. So now the cover sits at an angle as well. How can I fix this?

Name:  IMG_7873.jpg
Views: 2108
Size:  43.3 KB

2. What can I use to fill in the gaps? Silicone Caulk/ "Great Stuff" spray foam?
 

Last edited by MrSmithNV; 08-20-13 at 06:46 PM.
  #9  
Old 08-21-13, 06:57 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,872
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
1. The box is drilled on the left side into the stud. The screws go in at an angle and this puts the entire box at an angle with respect to the face of the wall. The screwed side is deeper in the wall. So now the cover sits at an angle as well. How can I fix this?
The mud ring/plaster ring isn't a cover. The box needs to be set flush with the face of the studs so drywall will cover all except for the 1-Gang opening. Refer to my post #5. You may have to remove a little more drywall to properly attach the box. I usually prefer backing behind the box to screw to.
 
  #10  
Old 08-21-13, 08:45 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 115
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks CasualJoe. That makes sense now. I didn't catch the "flush with stud" part before. And I was wondering how I was going to "finish" it. Drywall. Obviously duh! THanks.
 
  #11  
Old 08-21-13, 06:01 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,872
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
And after the drywall patching/painting, install the receptacle. You can buy a metal 1-Gang plate for the receptacle to finish it off properly.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: