Wiring GFCIs in a row?

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Old 08-25-13, 06:14 PM
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Wiring GFCIs in a row?

A friend told me that if you have a non-GFCI outlet wired downstream from a GFCI outlet, then the non-GFCI outlet will have the same protection as the GFCI outlet. Is this true? I wired a bathroom with all GFCI outlets and he pointed out that I could have saved money by doing it his way...

Thanks in advance!
Jeff
 
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Old 08-25-13, 06:23 PM
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He's right. Only needed one at the beginning of the chain where power came in.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 06:29 PM
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What about if I'm pig-tail wiring?
 
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Old 08-25-13, 06:29 PM
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That's what the LOAD terminals on a GFCI receptacle are for. Connecting to those provides the protection to every device downstream.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 08:13 PM
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You can't pig tail the GFCI receptacle if your going to protect other receptacles down the line. The incoming feed wires go to the LINE terminals on the GFI and the outgoing hot and neutral wires to the other receptacles goes to the LOAD terminals. If you reverse the LINE and LOAD the GFCI wont function.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 09:17 PM
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You don't pig-tail wiring on a GFCI unless you have three or more protected load cables, which would seriously overfill the box. Each terminal on a GFCI will accept 2 conductors. That allows one set of feed conductors and one set of unprotected load conductors on the LINE terminals and two sets of protected conductors on the LOAD terminals without any splicing or pigtailing of current-carrying conductors.
 
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Old 08-26-13, 07:31 AM
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A friend told me that if you have a non-GFCI outlet wired downstream from a GFCI outlet, then the non-GFCI outlet will have the same protection as the GFCI outlet. Is this true? I wired a bathroom with all GFCI outlets and he pointed out that I could have saved money by doing it his way...
What about if I'm pig-tail wiring?
You are both right. If you want to use a separate GFCI device at each location, you pigtail the wires at each box and use only the LINE terminals. If you want to save money, you use one GFCI device at the first location and use the LINE and LOAD terminals to protect the other downstream devices.

If I was wiring two bathrooms, I'd pigtail the wires and use a GFCI device in each bathroom just out of simplicity, they don't cost that much. If for some reason the power goes out in one bathroom, I don't like the idea of searching to find a GFCI device that may have tripped.
 
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