RV receptacle needed

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  #1  
Old 08-26-13, 10:31 PM
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RV receptacle needed

New to the forum. Looks like i'll be spending some time on here.:HF2:
I'm putting in a 30 amp receptical off my main panel. I understand I am suppose to use a 30 amp 120 volt single pole Breaker. I went to Home Depot and all I could find was a 30 amp 120/240 volt single pole Breaker. Will I burn up my RV if I use this?
Thanks for the help Luv
 
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  #2  
Old 08-26-13, 11:00 PM
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Yes, you will most certainly burn up the RV by using a circuit breaker rated at 120/240 volts.

No, the above is NOT true. However, since you had to ask the question I surmise that you do NOT have the necessary knowledge to be installing the circuit breaker and receptacle. Educating yourself is not difficult and starts with you purchasing the book Wiring Simplified and reading it cover to cover. You can buy this book on-line or in most mega-mart home improvement centers for less than $10. It is usually found in the electrical aisle rather than the books and magazines section.

Also, in the future please do NOT "piggy back" onto an existing thread. It confuses the heck out of those trying to help. The "start new thread" button is located in the upper left hand corner. A moderator will move your post to a new thread this time.
 
  #3  
Old 08-27-13, 06:11 AM
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If you used a two pole breaker you would just have one pole unused. Single pole breakers should be readily available.
 
  #4  
Old 08-27-13, 06:17 AM
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What size wire are you planning to use?
 
  #5  
Old 08-27-13, 08:47 AM
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Breaker

Thanks for all the help.
I just checked the MAIN PANEL and I saw a
Murray MP3030 1 Pole Duplex 30/30 amp, 120/240 VAC Breaker. The bottom leg of the breaker is not being used. Can I just connect my #8 black (hot) wire into the breaker and be good to go?

Murray MP3030 1 Pole Duplex 30A-30A Circuit Breaker - LA Lighting Store.com

My run is approx. 5' long. I am running #8 AWG for the hot, #10 AWG for the neutral and #12 for AWG the ground. I'm using a
30A-125v (TT-30R) outlet
Does this sound right?
 
  #6  
Old 08-27-13, 09:03 AM
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Actually you would use one black #10, one white #10, and one green #10. (Ground wire optional if continious metal conduit to metal box but recommended.

I saw a
Murray MP3030 1 Pole Duplex 30/30 amp, 120/240 VAC Breaker.
Not sure where you got the 240 volt part from. The number sources to a twin single pole 120v breaker. Yes, you can use the unused side.

Above assumes you are using conduit. If not you must run protected cable.
 
  #7  
Old 08-27-13, 09:26 AM
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Thx Ray
I am using larger guage wire because I plan on upgrading to a 50 amp service in the future.

I got the Murray MP3030 1 Pole Duplex 30/30 amp, 120/240 specifications from the web page. The Breaker I have in the panel only says "Murray MP 3030". This will work??..

The 5' run is in conduit.
thx luv
 
  #8  
Old 08-27-13, 10:20 AM
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50 amp

I was told that for a 50 amp service I could use #8 AWG for the hots, #10 AWG for the neutral and #12 AWG for the ground. This is a 5' run.
Is that not the case??
 
  #9  
Old 08-27-13, 10:27 AM
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I was told that for a 50 amp service I could use #8 AWG for the hots, #10 AWG for the neutral and #12 AWG for the ground.
#8 (copper) is 40 amps maximum. You don't undersize neutrals on loads that small. Ground can be #10. You would need four wires. What you are trying to do to future proof doesn't really make sense. It is only five feet so just use conduit large enough for three #6 and a #10 then pull new wire if you go to 50 amp.
 
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Old 08-27-13, 10:33 AM
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I got the Murray MP3030 1 Pole Duplex 30/30 amp, 120/240 specifications from the web page.
The people who write those pages don't understand what they are writing. See: MURRAY MP3030 30/30 Amp 1-Pole Twin 120 Volt Pluge-In Duplex Circuit Breaker

You can even verify it is a 120 breaker by measuring between the two breaker termanils. If it is 0 volts it is a 120 volt breaker.
 
  #11  
Old 08-27-13, 11:10 AM
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I understand now.
In the future my In-Laws may live in the RV. That being the case, they may run 2 AC units and the microwave at the same time. They will constantly be tripping the 30 amp breaker. So at that time I would upgrade to a 50 amp service. So i'm trying to run the right wires now so I don't have to pull new wires later. At that time all I will have to do is buy a new 50 amp breaker.

How do I measure between the two breaker terminals if it is 120 breaker?



thank you very much for all the help.
 
  #12  
Old 08-27-13, 12:19 PM
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How do I measure between the two breaker terminals if it is 120 breaker?
You measure between the two places you connect wires to on the tandem breaker. You put one probe of your multimeter on one connection and the other probe on the other connection. It should be zero volts.

A 120v 30 amp connection uses three wires. A 50 amp 240v uses four wires. The #6 needed for the 50 amp probably will not fit in the terminals for the 120v receptacle. You're trying to make an apple that can later be eaten as an orange just to save the ten minutes needed to change out the wires. <opinion> Doesn't make sense.
 
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Old 08-27-13, 12:44 PM
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You will also be going to a 120/240V feed to a subpanel in your RV if you go to 50A, everything about it will be different, including a 2-pole 240V breaker in your panel to feed and protect it.

I'm wondering whether it might be easier and simpler to go ahead and install the proper receptacle on the house and inlet on the RV for the 50A feed now, if you're pretty sure you'll be doing that eventually.
 
  #14  
Old 08-27-13, 06:20 PM
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Didn't know the #6 wire for the 50 amp wouldn't fit in the terminals for the 120v receptacle.

I thought I would save time and money by running the larger gauge wire now and just change the 30 amp breaker at a later date to a 50 amp breaker. I guess that won't work..
 
  #15  
Old 08-27-13, 06:26 PM
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My RV already has a cord with a 50 amp plug on the end of it. When I connect to a 30 amp service I put a 50 to 30 amp pigtail on the cord and plug it in. I don't know if that changes anything.
I probably won't change over to a 50 amp for a year or two.
 
  #16  
Old 08-27-13, 07:28 PM
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In the future my In-Laws may live in the RV. That being the case, they may run 2 AC units and the microwave at the same time.


My RV already has a cord with a 50 amp plug on the end of it.



Its 50 amp so just run 50 amp... Its a split panel in the rv..You have two a/c units. One runs on one side one on the other side of the panel.

When I connect to a 30 amp service I put a 50 to 30 amp pigtail on the cord and plug it in.

With the cheater you are only getting 30 amps to the rv.


( Best to run it right IMO) ...

the pedestals for rv's ( 50 amp) have two 50 amp breakers for 100 amps total. So you will be short changing the rv 70 amps of power....

Do it right and give the camper its full wattage....

( Just from my camper experience... I am not an electrician and dont want to confuse the issue....
 
  #17  
Old 08-27-13, 08:10 PM
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the pedestals for rv's ( 50 amp) have two 50 amp breakers for 100 amps total.
No, the total amps is still considered 50 amps but you have increased the available watts from 3600 to 12000 over three times as much. You could look at it as having two 50 amp 120 volt feeds instead of one 30 amp feed but that isn't the way it is normally expressed.
 
  #18  
Old 08-27-13, 08:33 PM
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No, the total amps is still considered 50 amps but you have increased the available watts from 3600 to 12000 over three times as much.
Its 50 amps per side AFAIK. Its 6000 watts per side. I guess they express it as 50 amp but its 50 amps for each leg of the trailer.....

You could look at it as having two 50 amp 120 volt feeds instead of one 30 amp feed but that isn't the way it is normally expressed.
I thought I said that??

No matter.... Just trying to stress to the OP why do double the work

You said it best here ray.

You're trying to make an apple that can later be eaten as an orange just to save the ten minutes needed to change out the wires.
 
  #19  
Old 08-27-13, 08:41 PM
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I understood you Mike but my reply was for all those who get the breaker size wrong. We had one member who for several posts kept say the water heater was on a forty amp breaker. We kept saying the breaker was probably too large. Then when they posted a picture we realized it was a twenty amp breaker and actually too small. Similar confusion has happened in other posts.
 
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