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Hamilton Breadmaker 110v-220v conversion and question about the heating element

Hamilton Breadmaker 110v-220v conversion and question about the heating element

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  #1  
Old 08-28-13, 08:40 PM
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Hamilton Breadmaker 110v-220v conversion and question about the heating element

Hi,

I've decided to convert mention appliance instead of using bulky transformer. As I see for now I just need to rewire the ac motor and exchange one ac-ac coil, no biggy. Now comes the heating element issue...of course it's rated 120v, it's 500w power drain. I can that it will heat up 3.5 time faster(28 Ohm vs 96 Ohm) and I know is the best to change it, but...do I really have to?
I've just checked 220v electric kettle and the heating element is not really thicker rated at 1800w! Do I really run risk on 500w? If not the thickness what are the other indicators that will prove it's not suitable?

Thanks for all input!
 
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Old 08-28-13, 09:49 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Just think.....if you run that unit on 230v at 50hz you can make bread twice as fast.

The breadmaker was designed with 60hz parts which will affect their performance if used on 50hz power. The timer/control board may not keep time correctly.

The heating element is sized for the job. Black and Decker feels that 500 watts is a good size for their breadmaker. If you decide to use that same element it would produce over 1800 watts. That would be too much heat for that process.

A heating element has to be designed for the application. That 500 watt element can't support producing 1800 watts of heat. If the heating element can't dissipate it's produced heat it.... it will expire.
 
  #3  
Old 08-29-13, 05:29 AM
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50/60Hz is no issue I think, the whole control panel is 12vdc, all relays are rated at 250avc. The only thing rated for 110v/60Hz is the motor, but once again I don't think it will make a huge difference - will see, I have no choice anyway regarding Hz - it's impossible to change.
I was thinking that thermostat will disconnect the heating element when it reaches the desired temperature, but you are probably right - this element will burn sooner or later, I might as well give it a try if a fuse it with 5amp, what do you think?
Or maybe just connect the heating element and check Ohm's and Amp's with multimeter?
I know I'm stubborn ;-) But I don't always believe what it's written on the label ;-)

Also I have little choice, this appliance is just not available in the wilderness of South America ;-) And even if it is it will be prohibitively expensive, it's better for me the change the elements and convert it.

BTW A few photos:
 
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Last edited by banjanti; 08-29-13 at 06:36 AM.
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