What type of breakers are these?

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  #1  
Old 09-04-13, 07:13 PM
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What type of breakers are these?

My sister has asked me to fix a broken plug in her shed, and to install a light over the door.

I asked her how many amp the breaker to the shed was, thinking 14-2 vs 12-2 purchase for the wire up to the light.

She sent this picture and said she was not sure.

Can I assume this breaker can handle 15 or 20, once the cover is off the panel seeing where the hot wire is attached?

I have not seen these breakers before.

Thank you,
 
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  #2  
Old 09-04-13, 07:31 PM
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Those are tandem breakers. It is two single pole breakers that fit in the space of one.
 
  #3  
Old 09-04-13, 07:38 PM
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They appear to be Square D QO.
 
  #4  
Old 09-04-13, 08:12 PM
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Be careful with these circuits if they have red wires on them.

Something is telling me that these are MWBC's due to the fact that these are 15202015 as opposed to just a 1515 and a 2020.

They aren't handle tied as the code didn't require that until '08.

If they do have a red wire on them, be sure to turn off both 15's or 20's depending on which one you use.
 
  #5  
Old 09-05-13, 05:23 AM
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Thank you,

I will buy 12-2 for light string as the shed is marked on the panel box for one breaker, not just one portion of the breaker. Hoping it was wired in the 20amp side.

I am curious to visit her and take the panel cover off and see how it is all wired.
 
  #6  
Old 09-05-13, 10:45 AM
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It really doesn't matter if they shed is wired on the 15 amp or the 20 amp side if you use 12-2 wire. It's perfectly legal to use larger wire but not legal to use smaller wire than the breaker can handle.
 
  #7  
Old 09-05-13, 11:11 AM
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Although legal, it's just not good practice unless you mark it at junctions that it's "15 amp max".

Someone could ass u me, from the size wire, it's a 20 amp.
 
  #8  
Old 09-05-13, 02:53 PM
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I agree the error risk seems to high to go with 14-2.

But in theory, should there not only be one of the two slots used?
It would seem the panel would be overloaded if both sides were used in all the possible slots?

This has no bearing on the repair I will do for her, but I am curious about the working of these breakers.
 
  #9  
Old 09-05-13, 06:14 PM
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But in theory, should there not only be one of the two slots used?
It would seem the panel would be overloaded if both sides were used in all the possible slots?
Nope. Tandems are usually used to reduce the size of the box. An example would be a 16 space 24 circuit panel. You get 24 circuits in a 16 space box. A more common example would be a 30 space 40 circuit panel.
 
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