Wiring Questions/Code for Kitchen Renovation

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  #1  
Old 09-04-13, 10:27 PM
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Wiring Questions/Code for Kitchen Renovation

I live in Florida and a friend of mine is going to help with the electrical. To make sure he's following code I have a few questions I was hoping to get answered.

1) I know that outlets must be GFCI in the kitchen, but does the 12/2 wire have to be run through a junction box first, or can it run from the attic down along the drywall and into a 1 gang outlet box that will attach to the drywall?

2) When running 12/2 wire across the attic and down the drywall for any purpose, does it always have to run through a junction box to be code?

3) I would like to have LED undercabinet lighting. When I went to Ikea I noticed that in their kitchen showrooms they had what appeared to be low voltage wire that popped out of the wall from the corner of the top of the backsplash/bottom of the cabinet and running underneath the cabinets connecting to the LED strip. I have 4 separate sections of cabinets throughout the kitchen I will be installing that I want to have LED lighting and I would like them to all run off of one wall switch. How do I theoretically set up the wiring to have it all on one switch and hooked up to one switch and hide the transformer on the top of the upper cabinets? The under cabinet lighting is the most confusing part to me. How do I set it up for when I get my new cabinets in?

The ones I saw at ikea are these RATIONELL LED countertop light - aluminum color, 24 " - IKEA
 
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Old 09-05-13, 02:09 AM
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1) no. wire can run straight to receptacles. code on kitchen countertop requires two dedicated 20 amp small appliance circuits (gfci protected). and there is also code on the placement of these receptacles.

2)no.

3)basically your lighting circuit must connect to switch first. and from there to the transformer and then to the first light which can be daisy chained to the second and third etc.

be very careful with electrical diy. even a few milliamps can kill.
 
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Old 09-05-13, 04:05 AM
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Thanks for your help, he has worked with electrical before but I have not. In terms of safety we will be killing all the breakers in the kitchen while working on it and he will test any existing wires before touching them with one of those wire devices that tells you if the wire is hot or not. Any other safety advice you would give me?
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:25 PM
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1) I know that outlets must be GFCI in the kitchen,
Only the 120V small appliance branch circuit (SABC) receptacles for your countertop and island must have GFCI protection. A receptacle for your refrigerator, garbage disposal or gas range, for example, does not.

12/2 wire have to be run through a junction box first, or can it run from the attic down along the drywall and into a 1 gang outlet box that will attach to the drywall?
Electrical cable should be run from the distribution panel to the box housing the first device on that circuit without any splices, if possible. All electrical boxes, including those that only contain splices, must be covered and accessible.

2) When running 12/2 wire across the attic and down the drywall for any purpose, does it always have to run through a junction box to be code?
The NEC does not require electrical cable to be placed in boxes. It does require that all electrical terminations and splices be made in approved enclosures, which may include boxes.

Tech Note:12 AWG is a wire, or conductor. 12-2/G Type NM-B is an electrical cable that has a plastic sheath containing three 12 AWG wires, two of which are insulated conductors.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 02:56 AM
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If I am not mistaken, I think maybe one of the questions the original poster has and what he might be doing is asking is if it ok to run a single 12-2 wire from the panel to a junction box and then connect multiple 12/2 wires individually from that junction box to all the counter GFCI outlets. That way, if one GFCI outlet is tripped, you only have to reset that specific outlet and not have to find the GFCI outlet that is upstream of the affected outlet.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 04:11 AM
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You may be correct but...
what he might be doing is asking is if it ok to run a single 12-2 wire from the panel to a junction box and then connect multiple 12/2 wires individually from that junction box to all the counter GFCI outlets. i
A wire is a single conductor. The correct term is cable, two or more wires in a metallic or nonmetallic sheath. Spidering wires instead of daisy chaining is code compliant but wastes wire and gives another less obvious more difficult to reach place for the circuit to fail. Imagine the next person trying to run down failed receptacles and attic full of blown in insulation not anticipating a wiring method not used in forty years was used.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 07:30 AM
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Sorry for the confusion in my terminology. I'm just trying to also understand this better.

I think one of the things original poster might be asking if its is ok to run a 12-2 electrical cable to a junction box and then have several individual 12-2 electrical cables come out of the junction box to go to each GFCI protected counter outlet. This way, when one GFCI outlet is tripped, none of the other outlets are tripped, and it would be easy to reset just that single affected outlet. Is this code compliant?
 

Last edited by tonic; 09-07-13 at 09:24 AM. Reason: Misspelling
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Old 09-07-13, 08:32 AM
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Yes but much more expensive. The same thing can be achieved by daisy chaining off only the line side of each receptacle and that saves wire but is still more expensive than the usual method of a single GFCI because of the cost of each GFCI.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 11:03 AM
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What I'm trying to do is basically make sure I have 20 amp receptacles for all of my kitchen outlets, as I am told for code you must have 2 breakers that are 20 amp and feed the power only to 1 kitchen receptacle GFCI at a time, and then the rest of the outlets can run from another 20amp breaker. However, right now I only have the kitchen running off 15amp breakers and none of them run just one countertop receptacle, but instead run multiple outlets etc.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 09-13-13 at 10:10 PM. Reason: Remove duplicate question
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Old 09-12-13, 01:19 PM
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What I'm trying to do is basically make sure I have 20 amp receptacles for all of my kitchen outlets, as I am told for code you must have 2 breakers that are 20 amp and feed the power only to 1 kitchen receptacle GFCI at a time, and then the rest of the outlets can run from another 20amp breaker.
Yes, you do need two 20A small appliance branch circuits for the countertop receptacles. Each circuit with #12 wire from a 20A breaker, but the receptacles themselves only need to be 15 amp rated, not 20 amp rated. Each circuit can feed a 15 amp GFCI receptacle and then several successive 15 amp duplex receptacles fed from the LOAD side of the GFCI receptacle so that all countertop receptacles on both circuits are GFCI protected.

20 amp receptacles are not required by the NEC.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 03:59 PM
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I am told for code you must have 2 breakers that are 20 amp and feed the power only to 1 kitchen receptacle GFCI at a time, and then the rest of the outlets can run from another 20amp breaker.
Yes, you must install at least two 20A small appliance branch circuits that are dedicated to supplying the receptacles for your kitchen countertop, island or peninsula. Each of those two circuits must be GFCI protected. The GFCI protection may be provided in your distribution panel or at the first device. Each circuit may have several receptacles. Each receptacle, whether GFCI or standard, does not have to be rated for more than 15A. The receptacles must be spaced no more than 4' apart.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 09-13-13 at 10:16 PM. Reason: Clarification
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Old 09-12-13, 04:49 PM
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Thanks, I am almost getting there...few more questions. I have found sites that say many different things for kitchen code, so I need to know the kitchen code basics.

1) From what I gather here I need at least 2 20 amp breakers that power the countertop receptacle outlets, but each of these breakers can have more than 1 outlet on them.

2) However, does every single countertop outlet have to be on a 20 amp breaker? I have 2 outlets that are on different 20 amp breakers, but I also have 2 outlets that are on 15amp breakers right now.

3) What other requirements by code are there, for example do any other appliances need an outlet dedicated to them?
 
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Old 09-12-13, 07:21 PM
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1) Correct.

2) All general purpose receptacles that serve a kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area are required to be 20 amp, also requiring the use of #12 wire/cable

3) Some appliances are required to have their own circuit include, but not limited to:
Dishwasher (If you have a disposal, most cases you can put it on the same circuit as the dishwasher if it is 20 amp)
Fastened in place microwave
Refrigerator (many times by manufacture)

These are required to be dedicated, but not required to be 20 amp.
 
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Old 09-13-13, 07:27 AM
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but I also have 2 outlets that are on 15amp breakers right now.
Don't forget, these will have to be corrected. If they are wired with 14-2 NM cable, they will have to be rewired and put on one of the two 20 amp circuits or they can be a third 20 amp circuit.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 09-13-13 at 09:46 PM. Reason: Remove reply to a question that has been moved to a new thread
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