Newbie Question about installing a Dual Fuel Range

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  #1  
Old 09-06-13, 08:26 AM
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Newbie Question about installing a Dual Fuel Range

Hello and thank you for taking a look at my post. I appreciate any feedback and I hope I'm not being redundant or asking a silly question.

I recently purchased a used GE Café Dual Fuel Range that I'm attempting to install. The plug connected to the range has specs of 40a 125/250V. My home, at one point had a hot tub hooked up that has since been disconnected. The wiring is still installed and hooked to the circuit box using 50A circuit. The wiring is labeled 8/3 600 volt and it is copper wiring. I've done research and for the most part (correct me if I'm wrong) what I've read says that the wiring that is installed is okay to use?

The second part of my question is where to install the plug for the range. Where the range is positioned is against a concrete wall so the electrical cannot be installed there and the range is designed to sit flush against the wall so there really isn't a viable option. Can I install the outlet beneath the floor, in the basement rafters, and plug the range in under the floor?

Thank you in advance.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:03 AM
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The plug connected to the range has specs of 40a 125/250V.
Typical electric range cords are rated at 50 amps? Look again, is that what you have? Can you provide a picture of the cord and plug?

The wiring is labeled 8/3 600 volt
If it is NM cable (aka romex) it is only good for 40 amps.

Where the range is positioned is against a concrete wall so the electrical cannot be installed there and the range is designed to sit flush against the wall so there really isn't a viable option. Can I install the outlet beneath the floor, in the basement rafters, and plug the range in under the floor?
The receptacle cannot be under the floor because the cord is not allowed to go through the floor. Look and see if a surface mount installation on the floor in the middle of the opening would allow the range to be pushed back without hitting the receptacle. Most residential ranges are capable of this.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:08 AM
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The wiring is labeled 8/3 600 volt and it is copper wiring. I've done research and for the most part (correct me if I'm wrong) what I've read says that the wiring that is installed is okay to use?
Yes but it was never right for a 50 amp breaker. It needs a 40 amp breaker.

Can I install the outlet beneath the floor, in the basement rafters, and plug the range in under the floor?f
No the cord isn't rated to penetrate the floor. You could put receptacle in a cabinet.

the range is designed to sit flush
Any I have seen have a large recess area somewhere on the back. Often this aligns with a drawer that is removable so you can access the receptacle.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:30 AM
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Well Shin Power Cord - 4 prong (model WS-001K)

- 4 Prong Well Shin Power Cord - Model WS-001K Power Cord [This item is new, never used - two cords came with the applicance and this one was not used]

- 40A 125/250V~

- E116330

- 4 Prong, 4 foot long cable

- Branded GE on the back of the Plug


I can't get a pic to upload...but the link is to another cord for sale on EBay. It is identical. Thanks.Well Shin Power Cord 4 Prong Model WS 001K New Never Used | eBay
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:36 AM
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There is not a question with the cord. It is installation of the breaker, cable, and receptacle we are discussing.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 09:41 AM
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Thank you for the information regarding the receptacle...The cabinet installation would be difficult because of the thickness of the plug and the outlet but it may be the best way to go about it. In regards to the surface mount on the floor...I considered this but thought it might be dangerous to have the outlet laid flat behind/underneath the cooking service in case something spilled? This wouldn't be an issue and would be within code?

Lastly, regarding the 50 amp breaker...a lot of what I have read says the breaker protects the wiring and not the appliance...so a 50 amp breaker would protect this particular wiring from overheating, correct? Do I need to worry about the appliance considering it's a range and all of the different cooking units would never be in use at the same time? Would this be a fire hazard or a damaged appliance hazard? I've also read that having it hooked up for 50 amps would save me time/money if I wanted to change the range in the future.

Thank you kindly for your quick responses...Please don't think that I'm questioning any responses I get, I learn what's right by understanding why other options are wrong. Thanks again!
 
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Old 09-06-13, 11:52 AM
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The cabinet installation would be difficult because of the thickness of the plug
Not really. Just need a hole saw and place it near the back of the cabinet side so the stove hides it. Have you checked the back profile of the stove yet?

In regards to the surface mount on the floor...I considered this but thought it might be dangerous to have the outlet laid flat behind/underneath the cooking service in case something spilled?
You are correct. Did somebody suggest that? If someone mentioned floor mount thet may have meant:



the breaker protects the wiring and not the appliance...so a 50 amp breaker would protect this particular wiring from overheating, correct?
Yes. If the wiring is #6 or larger you may use a 50a breaker however if the manufacturer recommends a 40 amp breaker you must follow the manufacturer's instructions. A 40 amp breaker can be used with #6. The receptacle will be the same. If you needed more amps in the future you would just increase the breaker size if you already had to #6.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 03:24 PM
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- 40A 125/250V~

- E116330

- 4 Prong, 4 foot long cable

- Branded GE on the back of the Plug
The plug on your cord is a NEMA 14-50P (50 amp plug)

Typical electric range cords are rated at 50 amps? Look again, is that what you have? Can you provide a picture of the cord and plug?
Look at the picture of a surface mount receptacle that ray posted. Look carefully and closely and you'll see it is marked NEMA 14-50R (50 amp receptacle)

Even if your cord is marked 40 amps, it still has a 50 amp plug on it. My guess is since it is branded as GE is it was imported from China.

Here is a similar cord from a different manufacturer, it is rated 50 amps and has the same 50 amp 14-50P plug.

Electricord 4 Wire, 6 ft. Electric Range Cord : Sears Outlet
 
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