Fuses getting extremely hot

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  #1  
Old 09-06-13, 01:08 PM
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Fuses getting extremely hot

My main fuses overheat if I use my ac and oven at the same time or the ac and dryer. The ac, stove and dryer run off two 60 amp fuses. They remain cool but the main 100 amp fuses { the pull fuse holder} is extremely hot to the touch. What could be the cause?
 
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  #2  
Old 09-06-13, 01:27 PM
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Two possible causes, the first is that you are "pulling" close to the limit (100 amperes) on the fuses and the second possible cause is that the contacts, either the fuse clips themselves or the plug-in contacts on the pull-out fuse holder are corroded.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 03:45 PM
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Two possible causes, the first is that you are "pulling" close to the limit (100 amperes) on the fuses and the second possible cause is that the contacts, either the fuse clips themselves or the plug-in contacts on the pull-out fuse holder are corroded.
I am going to add a third possibility. The connection on the blades (and fuse clips) of the pullout could just be loose; the tension gradually goes away as the equipment ages and heat accelerates the degradation. How old is that fuse panel? I am guessing somewhere between 35 and 60 years old.
 
  #4  
Old 09-07-13, 05:27 AM
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Don't forget the (fat) wire connections to the fuse block holder spring clips behind or under the fuse block holder in the panel; these could be loose or corroded, also generating heat.

Many a panel has had to be replaced because the connections behind the main fuse block or main breaker had become deformed from overheating so many times due to loose connections. Sometimes the connections were riveted together in which case it was difficult or impossible to correct th problem after corrosion set in.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 05:45 AM
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Do not attempt to tighten any wires on the line side of the fuse holder. They are always hot. The electric company not you must pull the meter first.

What is the full load amps of the AC, oven and dryer?
 
  #6  
Old 09-07-13, 06:31 AM
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As everybody pointed out your 100 amp fuse holder needs to be checked out. There is a poor connection at the 100 amp main and that is causing it getting hot. If you are handy you can do this yourself, but extreme caution needs to exercised as their can be energized wires/connections even with the main pulled.

If you do not feel comfortable doing this, I suggest hiring an electrician.
 
  #7  
Old 09-07-13, 07:21 AM
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@casualjoe the panel is an older Murray maybe 1971 or before. Should the 100 amp fuses be changed to a higher amp? Is that possible?
 
  #8  
Old 09-07-13, 07:57 AM
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@casualjoe the panel is an older Murray maybe 1971 or before. Should the 100 amp fuses be changed to a higher amp? Is that possible?
No, DO NOT put in higher amperage fuses! The main fuses are sized to the service entrance wiring. I don't think you'd find higher amperage fuses that would fit the fuseholder anyway, but if you can, do not use them. The issue doesn't seem to be overloading so much, but a poor connection most likely because of age, corrosion or both. If you were blowing the 100 amp fuses there might be an issue with overloading, but you have not mentioned blowing the main fuses. Your fuse panel is at least 42 years old. I'd start saving for replacing it with a modern circuit breaker panel.

You mentioned that the A-C, stove and dryer operate off 2 - 60 amp fuses. Are all three circuits connected to the same 2 - 60 amp fuses? If so, that would be another problem that should be corrected if or when you upgrade the panel.

In the meanwhile, can you try to not run the stove or dryer while the A-C is on? The overheating could cause a fire. Hopefully within a few more weeks you can do without the A-C till spring.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 08:17 AM
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Thank you all for the replies. CasualJoe thank you so much.
 
  #10  
Old 09-07-13, 08:20 AM
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@casualjoe yes all three are wired into the 2 60 amp fuses. Should they not be? If we change the breaker box should they be wired into separate breakers?
 
  #11  
Old 09-07-13, 08:44 AM
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@tolyn Ironhand if we flipped the breaker at the power meter would the wires still have a charge?
 
  #12  
Old 09-07-13, 09:13 AM
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If you flip the main disconnect it should be dead but always verify with a meter. What is the amp rating of the main breaker? What size wire to the fuse box?

The reason for the questions is having a main disconnect makes replacing the fuse box with a breaker box a very doable job. Just getting a new box would eliminate any mechanical cause of overheating. If main breaker size and wire size permit you could even increase the subpanel available amps which mighr take of load cause, if any, for the overheating.
 
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Old 09-07-13, 09:17 AM
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The oven, dryer and A/C should be on dedicated circuits. The 60 amp circuit should not be shared. Also the 60 amp fuses will not protect the smaller wiring to the A/C and dryer.
 
  #14  
Old 09-07-13, 09:57 AM
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It is a 100 amp. I have no idea the wire size how do I measure that?
 
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Old 09-07-13, 11:30 AM
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We also have 8 screw in type fuses no idea if they are right either there is no list of what size they should be. Across the board are 15 amp to 20 amp. Most are for small appliances, lights,washer but one is for the water heater. What should be the fuse size for these. Sorry for all the question.
 
  #16  
Old 09-07-13, 11:32 AM
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It is a 100 amp. I have no idea the wire size how do I measure that?
Obviously the breaker disconnect at the meter is a lot newer than the fuse box. Was the meter socket and service entrance wiring changed out when the breaker disconnect was put in? The wire between the breaker disconnect and fuse box, is it newer or is it closer to the age of the fuse box?

It would be quite helpful if you could provide some pictures of the entire service on the outside, including weatherhead and service cable coming down wall, meter socket and breaker main disconnect. On the inside pictures would be helpful of the fuse box with the cover removed. Is that something you could do?

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

15 amp fuses are used to protect circuits with 14 AWG wire, 20 amp fuses are used to protect circuits with 12 AWG wire. Most typical electric water heaters require #10 AWG wire and 30 amp fuses.
 
  #17  
Old 09-08-13, 11:54 AM
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Today my bf and his friend are going to put in a new breaker box. They have all power cut and all wires labeled. He said he has done this many times so I trust they know what they are doing. He is putting in the breaker type no more fuses. Thank you all so much for your help.
 
  #18  
Old 09-08-13, 12:05 PM
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Good plan. Thanks for letting us know.
 
  #19  
Old 09-08-13, 12:10 PM
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I would have been lost without all of you helping me. You guys ROCK. Thanks so much.
 
  #20  
Old 09-08-13, 12:37 PM
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I am sure the person doing the work knows his job but he is running four wires from the main disconnect isn't he? In the old days you could run three and may have been done with the fuse box but that is no longer permitted. You must have two hots, one neutral, and one ground. The ground must be bonded at the new panel and the neutral isolated.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-08-13 at 07:06 PM.
  #21  
Old 09-08-13, 01:50 PM
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I just ask him, he said that is how he has it. Thank you so much for helping me.
 
  #22  
Old 09-08-13, 07:04 PM
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Let us know how it turns out.
 
  #23  
Old 09-09-13, 07:35 AM
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Hi all, I now have all the breakers properly labeled. The range, ac and dryer now have their own decated breaker. The range is 60 amp the dryer and ac have 30 amp breakers.
I might be imaging this but I think my lights are even brighter.
I hope all of you have a GREAT week.
Thanks again for everything.
 
  #24  
Old 09-09-13, 07:59 AM
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The range is 60 amp
Just a FYI for your use. Typical 30 inch wide electric ranges usually require a 40 amp circuit and some require a 50 amp circuit. Electric range receptacles are almost always rated 50 amp maximum. Do you have a normal residential electric range or a huge semi-commercial model?

the dryer and ac have 30 amp breakers.
The 30 amp circuit and breaker for the dryer sounds correct and the A-C is probably also correct to have a 30 amp circuit and breaker. The breaker and circuit for A-C units is determined by the specs of that unit, but 30 amps covers a great deal of units up through 3 to 3 1/2 tons.
 
  #25  
Old 09-09-13, 08:09 AM
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Ha I think I have a 60 amp on my home range as well intersting .
 
  #26  
Old 09-09-13, 08:17 AM
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@casualjoe should I have him change the 60 amp for a 40 amp? I just have a small residential range. Also should I not use the range until it is changed?
 
  #27  
Old 09-09-13, 10:43 AM
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@Wilson Jess I had a really old fuse box that was over heating.
 
  #28  
Old 09-09-13, 12:16 PM
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@casualjoe should I have him change the 60 amp for a 40 amp? I just have a small residential range. Also should I not use the range until it is changed?
I think I would have it changed. The last two Whirlpool electric self cleaning ranges I bought both required a 40 amp circuit. As for using it till it's changed, that's a call I cannot make for you, but if it is to be changed in the not too distant future, hmmmm. You'll have to make that decision.
 
  #29  
Old 09-09-13, 12:17 PM
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Please do NOT use "text" on these forums. It is difficult to read and understand.

wilson_jess

haha I come in the thread and things get quite.
Quite what?
 
  #30  
Old 09-09-13, 12:19 PM
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@casualjoe I think I won't use the Range until I get it changed. Thank you again for all the help.
 
  #31  
Old 09-09-13, 05:03 PM
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... things get silent (quiet).

Appliances, tools, etc. have maximum permissible circuit amperes ratings as well as stated maximum draw during operation. Actually the starting amperage may exceed the circuit amperage since this is only for a second or two.

So you must run separate circuits with appropriate fuses/breakers (or install a subpanel somewhere along the circuit) if different appliances have different circuit amperes ratings.

You may not change the plug on an appliance or tool so as to fit a receptacle with a higher amperage rating. You may not install a receptacle on a circuit with higher amperage rating than the receptacle has.
 
  #32  
Old 09-11-13, 10:22 AM
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@casualjoe the 60 amp is now changed to a 40 amp. That means I am back to cooking. Bummer Thanks to EVERY ONE that gave such awesome advice. You are all invited to dinner anytime you are in my area. Have an awesome day. Please remember the 9/11 fallen and their loved ones today.
 
  #33  
Old 09-11-13, 10:32 AM
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I'd suggest barbeque but I'm sure you're anxious to use the stove again.
 
  #34  
Old 09-11-13, 10:39 AM
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BBQ sounds like a good plan. Anxious, well not so much. Lol
 
  #35  
Old 09-11-13, 10:57 AM
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You are all invited to dinner anytime you are in my area.
Sounds like a road trip! Can you handle 75 to 100 for dinner?
 
  #36  
Old 09-11-13, 11:03 AM
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Lol the more the merrier...
 
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