two three way switches and outlets in a bedroom

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  #1  
Old 09-19-13, 10:57 AM
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two three way switches and outlets in a bedroom

Please help. this is what we have:

Switch at start of hallway has (three cables coming in: one is the constant power, one is the cable that works all of my daughters outlets in the room next to the hall, and one cable is the travelers to the next switch box)

Switch at end of hall only has three wires in it, one white (which is hot) one red and one black. The black and red are the traveler wires.

Before I changed out the switches to flat switches all worked fine we had no idea that my daughters room was connected to the switch. After replacing the switches to flat switches all will not work at the same time.

I have:
At the first switch found the "hot" and the two travelers and connected them, also doing the same at the other end. Hall light works

If I connect in the outlets wire in with the "HOT" in the switch my daughters room will work and the hall light will work if you only use one switch. I want to know how do I connect all wires so that my daughters room with work and I can use both switches in the hall way.

Thank you
 
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  #2  
Old 09-19-13, 12:14 PM
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one is the constant power, one is the cable that works all of my daughters outlets in the room
Is it a 2-conductor (+G) able or 3- conductor (+G)?

one white (which is hot)
You mean the common. "Hot", which is not a precise term, would be in the other box where you presumably have a 2-conductor cable that brings in power. It would be the black of that cable.

At the first switch found the "hot" and the two travelers
No you have found a 3-conductor cable that is used for the two travelers and common. Hot would be the black of a two conductor cable that brings power in. That cable is called "Line". You have also have a "Load" cable that goes to the receptacle. Tell us if it is 3-conductor or 2-conductor and we can go from there.

A 2-conductor cable has a black, white and sometimes a bare wire.
A 3-conductor cable has a black, red, white and sometimes a bare.
 
  #3  
Old 09-19-13, 12:47 PM
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Thank you for responding, I am sorry I did not use the correct terms thank you for explaining, this is what I have:

In the first box with the switch:

2 conductor cable (load?)-to outlets: black, white and ground
2 conductor cable (line?) common -bringing power in: black, white and ground
3 conductor cable (two traveler's and common?): black, red, and white


The second box with a switch:
3 conductor cable: black, red and white
 
  #4  
Old 09-19-13, 01:20 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm not seeing enough cables here. For everything to work the way you describe it, there needs to be a 2-conductor, 3-wire cable from one of the switch boxes to the hallway light. This list:
  • xx-2/G from panel (line power in)
  • xx-2/G to receptacles in daughter's room (load power out)
  • xx-3/G between the two switch boxes (traveler cable)
  • xx-2/G from one of the switch boxes to the hallway light (switch power to load, missing)
Or did I miss something?
 
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Old 09-19-13, 01:27 PM
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The second switch box is not in the equation but just for future info by code that white wire needs to be redesignated blue, or red or black or any color but gray or green on both ends. It can be done with bands of colored tape or felt tip marker or colored liquid electrical insulation.

Now on to the important part.
  • In the first switch box connect together line black, hallway load black, and the recolored white of the 3-conductor 3-way cable.
  • Connect the black of the receptacle load cable to common terminal of switch.
  • Connect white of line to white of receptacle load and hallway load white..
  • Red and Black of 3-way 3-conductor cable to switch traveler terminals.
  • Grounds connected as specified by code.
Assumes at second switch recolored white is connected to common.
 
  #6  
Old 09-19-13, 02:20 PM
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Nashkat1,
Thank you.

Only the one 3/G and two 2/G were here when we moved in. Everything worked fine until I changed out to the flat light switch. Then we have our problem.

Ray2047,

I have learned today that the "white" should have been colored something else and I shall do that.

In the first switch box connect together line black, hallway load black (hallway load black? I am not sure if you mean the outlet load black) and the recolored white of the 3-conductor 3-way cable.

Connect the black of the receptacle load cable to common terminal of switch.
When you tell me to do step two I am gathering that I need to use (sorry if it is the wrong term) a jumper to use after I connect the first three together.

Connect white of line to white of receptacle load and hallway load white.. Again here I only have two whites left after I connect the white of the 3/G in the first grouping. I only have the white line and the white load left.


Assumes at second switch recolored white is connected to common.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz2fNIgSxRE
 
  #7  
Old 09-19-13, 02:50 PM
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I misread. I thought you wrote you had a 2-conductor cable to the hallway. If you don't as Nash wrote you are missing a cable.
 
  #8  
Old 09-19-13, 03:01 PM
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thank you I understand we are missing a cable. But like I said before this was all working when we bought the house the only thing that changed was the fact I put in new flat switches do you have any idea how we can wire it back so it all works again thank you
 
  #9  
Old 09-19-13, 06:16 PM
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Tell us about the hallway light wiring. Tell us about the cables at the light and switch.

One other thing you are using a multimeter not a non contact tester to determine what is hot aren't you. If you did use a non contact tester then your statements about what is hot may be wrong.
 
  #10  
Old 09-19-13, 09:32 PM
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It would appear that the three way switch leg is broken at the light.

The three wire in the first switch box could not go to directly to the second switch as there is only a single three wire cable at that switch.

Here is my take on the wiring.

At the first switch..... connect all the whites together.
Connect the hot in black and load out black wires together and add a short jumper of black wire to go to the common of the switch.

Connect the red and blacks wires of the three wire cable to the traveler positions on the switch.

I know....you are saying that there wasn't a black jumper before and that was because both black wires were attached to the common of the switch. One in the stab and one on the screw.
 
  #11  
Old 09-19-13, 10:07 PM
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I agree with PJ's analysis. It's the only way i can figure out to get a complete circuit in to feed the bedroom receptacles.
 
  #12  
Old 09-22-13, 02:44 PM
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Here's one additional thought: What if the power is coming from the bedroom receptacles instead of going to them?

If that's the case, everything should work if:

In the second switch box the red and black wires are connected to the two traveler terminals and the white wire, with a color tag, is connected to the common terminal.

In the first box, the red and black wires in the 3-conductor cable are connected to the two traveler terminals; the black wire from the bedroom is spliced to the white wire, with a color tag, in the 3-conductor cable; the white wires from the two 2-conductor cables are spliced together; and the remaining black wire, in the cable that's presumably going to the light, is connected to the common terminal on the switch.
 
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