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Using 12-3 to run 2 circuits with 2 gfci's keeps tripping?

Using 12-3 to run 2 circuits with 2 gfci's keeps tripping?

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  #1  
Old 09-21-13, 06:22 AM
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Using 12-3 to run 2 circuits with 2 gfci's keeps tripping?

I ran 12-3 wire into my kitchen and the goal was to make 2 different circuits to alternate outlets. I also want them to be protected by gfci's. Here's what I did-

I used a 20 amp double pole breaker and ran the 12-3 to the first gfci outlet - I connected the white and black to the bottom of the gfci. The ground to the ground. Then on the load side I connected the white and black to go out. The red wire was just connected to the red wire which goes to the next gfci outlet. On the next gfci the white and red was connected to the bottom. Then the red continues onto the fourth reg outlet. The white and the black go to the third reg outlet. Only one gfci will come on at a time - keeps tripping.

So I tried to just start from the beginning and removed the rest. I have the first gfci working fine but when I add the second gfci it keeps tripping the first one. If I reset the first one it trips the second again. Only one will work at a time. What am I doing wrong here? Is the shared neutral tripping them. I attached a picture of the layout I was trying to run.

Any help would be great. I'm losing my mind! Thanks in advance- Buzz
 
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  #2  
Old 09-21-13, 06:52 AM
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You are using the same neutral conductor at each receptacle location, alternately with the red and black, that won't work. At the first box, you must split the two circuits and run from there with two 12-2 cables, one for each circuit, to each receptacle location. You cannot have a GFCI receptacle before the neutral is split. At that first box you should have three whites and a white pigtail spliced together so you can use a GFCI receptacle at that box.
 
  #3  
Old 09-21-13, 08:27 AM
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Don't use the load connections on any of the GFCIs unless it is a completely new (different) cable.
 
  #4  
Old 09-21-13, 08:29 AM
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Okay then since I already have all of the drywall and cabinets installed should I just make it one circuit then with the one gfci on the front end? Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 09-21-13, 08:49 AM
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If you only have three wire cable between boxes........you could put the first GFI receptacle on the black and white wire. Make a joint at the first box where you have white in white out and a short jumper to that receptacle.

At the second box you can put a second GFI receptacle on the white and red wire. From the second GFI receptacle on will be regular receptacles on the black and white wires. Cap the red off.

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Last edited by PJmax; 09-21-13 at 09:00 AM. Reason: Illustration added
  #6  
Old 09-21-13, 10:16 AM
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Or just use a GFCI at each box connecting only to the line. In that case you could use your diagram. Or cheaper probably use a 240 volt GFCI breaker, non-GFCI receptacles, and your diagram.
 
  #7  
Old 09-21-13, 02:52 PM
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Or just use a GFCI at each box connecting only to the line.
I like ray's suggestion, that's what I would do.
 
  #8  
Old 09-21-13, 03:38 PM
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The only problem is loss of a circuit. All four would now be on one circuit.

As far as using a double pole GFI breaker to feed those circuits ...... you would need to purchase one that has a load neutral connection on the breaker.
 
  #9  
Old 09-21-13, 03:45 PM
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No you would use both circuits. The receptacle would only see the load connected to it.
 
  #10  
Old 09-21-13, 03:51 PM
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Ahhhh..... use a GFI receptacle at each box. That would work.
 
  #11  
Old 09-22-13, 06:46 AM
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Thanks for the replies and suggestions - You guys are awesome! - I thought it could be done. I would rather use PJ's idea since I would already have the receptacles that are needed. In PJ's picture it looks like the first gfci would be on its own circuit and the following 3 after that would be on a circuit.

1 - Shouldn't I use the red to power the 3rd and 4th outlet from the load side of the 2nd gfci since the red circuit would be powering them? Then the black wouldn't need to extend past the first gfci since the circuit ends there?

2- Could I still alternate the last 2 outlets by powering the 3rd one from the load line from the first gfci (black) and then just power the 4th one from the load line of the 2nd gfci (red)?
 
  #12  
Old 09-22-13, 07:19 AM
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1) Yes, you can do that.

2) No, you can't do that, same issue as before, the neutral would be shared.
 
  #13  
Old 09-22-13, 11:34 AM
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RE: #2

No.....that would be back to your starting diagram and the first way you wired it.
 
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