Replacing Wall Oven

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  #1  
Old 09-23-13, 08:24 PM
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Replacing Wall Oven

Hey all, so I have a 2002 Jenn Air 30 inch wall oven that has stopped working. I have been doing some internet research to find a replacement. I like some kenmore models and was reading the installation instructions just to see.

Anyway the instructions talk about 3 or 4 wire installations. The junction for my present oven is in a faux cabinet under the oven. I killed the breaker and pulled the cover panel off the box. The box has 4 wires coming from oven. Black, red, green and white. The load line is a 2 wire (Both black and 1 bare). The present configuration is load black to black. Load black to red, load bare to a press clamp connected to the white and green. I have a feeling when I get a new oven I shouldn't reconnect it this way since the white is running on a bare line. I have decent access to my box ( 40 ft run) and was thinking of having an electrician replace it since the present is a 60 amp double pole switch. Should I have new wiring pulled for a new oven?
 
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Old 09-23-13, 08:45 PM
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Most new appliances require a four wire connection. The fourth wire is a safety ground. They can be rewired to work on three .... like yours ..... but running a new cable is the way to go if possible.

You would be running 6/3 w/ground.
 
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Old 09-24-13, 06:32 AM
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Most new appliances require a four wire connection. The fourth wire is a safety ground. They can be rewired to work on three .... like yours ..... but running a new cable is the way to go if possible. You would be running 6/3 w/ground.
I believe the OP already has a 4-wire circuit.

I killed the breaker and pulled the cover panel off the box. The box has 4 wires coming from oven. Black, red, green and white.
I took that statement by the OP to mean there is a 4-wire circuit from the circuit breaker in the panel to the junction box under the existing oven, but the OP hasn't told us what size the circuit conductors are. Although, he indicated it was on a 60 amp breaker which is too high.

The load line is a 2 wire (Both black and 1 bare).
I took this to be the OP's existing oven wiring.
 
  #4  
Old 09-24-13, 08:52 PM
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I don't believe it is a 4 wire circuit. The line from the main just has three wires (black, black, and bare). The two blacks appear to 8 or 10 gauge aluminum.

I misspoke about the breaker. It is a double pole 30 amp breaker and I was thinking it was a 60 amp but it's a double pole 30.

The existing oven is a 4 wire device. (Black, red, white, and green). The wiring is load black to oven black, load black to oven red, load bare is connected to a terminal board where the oven white and oven green is connected into. I am assuming the neutral and ground and returning to the main on the bare which I don't think it good since the bare wire is not insulated.

I am thinking of having an electrician run a new 4 wire 8 gauge copper from the main to the new oven.

I am not sure if there is any way to properly connect a new oven to the existing circuit.

The line from the main to the oven junction box looks like a power feed line that the electric company would use but I am not sure.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 01:28 AM
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You don't have a four wire supply. You have a two wire with ground. Probably an older style SE or SER cable. Gray/dark gray pvc jacket.

If it's on a thirty amp breaker then it should be at least #8 aluminum cable.

I would double check and make sure that the new oven will operate on that 30 amp breaker. You may need to replace it with a 40A breaker when you run the new #8 supply wire.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 07:06 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

This is what caused some confusion: You're saying
The wiring is load black to oven black, load black to oven red, load bare is connected to a terminal board where the oven white and oven green is connected into. I am assuming the neutral and ground and returning to the main on the bare which I don't think it good since the bare wire is not insulated.
It's a matter of terminology. The conductors coming to a branch circuit outlet from an overcurrent protection device - a fuse or circuit breaker - are carrying line voltage. A device attached to that wiring is a load. The description of your existing setup, using standard terminology, is:
The wiring is line black to oven black, line black to oven red; line bare is connected on a terminal block to the oven white and oven green. I am assuming the neutral and ground and returning to the main on the bare which I don't think is good since the bare wire is not insulated.
 
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