Wiring a 120V baseboard heater

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-03-13, 02:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 68
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wiring a 120V baseboard heater

I want to put in a 500W baseboard heater running on 120volts (Dimplex - Home Page Home Heating Linear Convector Baseboards Products Linear Proportional Convector) and I'm wondering if its possible to wire it up to an existing 15 amp circuit in my house using 14-2 wire? This circuit has 5 lights and 2 receptacles. Only 2 of those lights and one receptacle will be used often. I want it put it in the front entrance way of my house that doesn't have a source of heat and I want to wire it up to a light switch I have in there that controls the entrance way light and outside front door light. Since its only 500W and 120v can I get away with this without overloading the circuit and can I use 14-2 wire without the wire heating up too much? I think the draw on the heater is 4-6 amps. I think most of the lights are using 60W bulbs which don't even draw 1 amp. Basically the thing I'm concerned with the most is if I use 14-2 wire which is what the rest of the circuit is using, will it heat up too much because its not 12-2?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-03-13, 02:16 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
You're in Canada, so check you local codes, but if the circuit is on a 15 amp breaker, the 14-2 wiring will not be a problem, amperage wise. Your code people may require a dedicated circuit. Since it has its own switching, I would not separately switch it, but leave it hardwired through its incorporated thermostat.
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-13, 02:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 68
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yeah I'm not sure what the code is I'm just wondering whats safe I guess and if the wire leading up to the heater would get too hot. But yeah it would be running on a 15 amp breaker with the rest of the circuit.
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-13, 02:59 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 53,198
Received 376 Votes on 353 Posts
Your code would dictate the actual wiring method but the heater on that circuit would not be unsafe.
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-13, 03:06 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I want to put in a 500W baseboard heater running on 120volts ... and I'm wondering if its possible to wire it up to an existing 15 amp circuit in my house using 14-2 wire? ... Basically the thing I'm concerned with the most is if I use 14-2 wire which is what the rest of the circuit is using, will it heat up too much because its not 12-2?
On a 15A circuit wires with 14AWG conductors, you should use 14-2/G cable, not 12-2. If any of the wiring is going to overheat it will be the home run to the panel, not the part connecting this new load. The thermal overload protection provided by the circuit is designed to protect against having that go too high.

A 500W load on a 120V circuit is 500W. It doesn't matter what size light bulbs you're using or how often the lights will be on. What matters is how much current they could draw if they were all on and each one had the largest bulb it was rated for in it. Let's say that's another 500W. The standard estimating value for a duplex receptacle is 1.5A, or 180W. Two of those is another 360W. So you should have 1,360W of load connected to this circuit, total.

A 15A circuit can supply up to 1,440W of continuous load. Your circuit should be able to handle everything safely, so long as you don't plug a space heater or hair dryer into one of the receptacles.

Do check with your local jurisdiction. They're the only people who can tell you what their standards are.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: