Blew a CB now outlets don't work

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  #1  
Old 10-08-13, 08:50 PM
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Blew a CB now outlets don't work

Ok here's what happened. I was running a air compressor on an outdoor outlet. The circuit breaker blew a couple times, I would flip it back and it was fine. The third time it tripped I reset it but there was no power. It appears as though a few of the kitchen outlets were on the same circuit ( the outdoor outlet I was using is right next to the kitchen) and now now of them work either. Using a non contact tester shows there is power to all the outlets, however if I plug in the little tester that came with it into the outlet I get NO lights on it at all. From what I have seen none of the outlets are equipped with a GFI. Also, all the wires in the breaker box do appear tight and well secured. Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated. This is my first house so I'm trying to learn a thing or 2.
 
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Old 10-08-13, 09:04 PM
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Exterior receptacles have required GFI protection since the 80's. I would have you look for a GFI hidden outside, in a bathroom or in the garage.

What is the age of the house?
 
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Old 10-08-13, 09:16 PM
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Give the near useless non contact tester to your kid to play with while you use the real voltage tester. You need to check for voltage from hot to neutral and hot to ground. An $8-$15 cheap analog multimeter is best but the tester you have will be okay for initial tests. If you can't find a tripped GFCI the problem may be a bad connection at the last working recptacle on the circuit or the first non working receptacle. On non GFCI receptacles move any back stabs to the screws. (GFCIs are back wired not back stabbed and those connections are okay.) See also: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...ther-info.html
 
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Old 10-09-13, 10:40 PM
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So the house is older but the wiring is fairly new. I just bought the house so I don't know much about it except it was all redone within the last 7 yrs. it was done kinda sloppy but the home inspector did say it was done right.

So my next 2 questions are
1. You said outdoor outlets have a GFI. There's no visible GFI switch on the face of the outlet, where else do I need to be looking.

2. If everything was working fine till the CB blew how is it possible that there is suddenly a "bad connection." I had never had any kind of problems with any of he other outlets or lights on the circuit, it doesn't make sense to meet that suddenly that happens, but hey I'm no electrician and that's whyim here asking for help.

Thanks everyone,
Mike
 
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Old 10-10-13, 12:32 AM
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Mike.... you used a non-contact tester and it showed that you had hot but no neutral. That would mean you aren't looking for a tripped GFI. You will be looking for an open neutral. You will need to determine every device on the problem circuit and remove them one at a time to check for loose connections. Chances are you'll find wires pushed into the back of the receptacles like Ray mentioned.

I wouldn't say it was all done right. GFI receptacles are required in bathrooms, kitchens, garages, outside and in wet areas. A quick and easy way to wire is to put one GFI receptacle in the first junction box and then connect multiple regular receptacles in the following locations.

Hypothetically they could have put a GFI receptacle in the basement and then went up to the kitchen and then outside.
 
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Old 10-10-13, 07:54 AM
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Hypothetically they could have put a GFI receptacle in the basement and then went up to the kitchen and then outside.
This wouldn't be to current code, but that doesn't mean it isn't done and that also doesn't mean it didn't pass inspection. You could even have a GFCI circuit breaker with a yellow test button on the breaker. The bottom line is, the GFCI device could be anywhere.
 
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Old 10-10-13, 08:29 AM
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We have one member who found one hidden behind a water heater. It wasn't visible till the water heater was removed for replacement. Another member found one hidden behind one of those plug-in multipliers that totally cover the receptacle and provide six places to plug in. Even a power brick (power supply) could be large enough to hide the test button.
 
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Old 10-10-13, 08:54 AM
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And sometimes they are in plain sight at the main service panel and get overlooked.
 
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