Remodel Electrical Permit/Inspection process question

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  #1  
Old 10-14-13, 04:16 PM
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Remodel Electrical Permit/Inspection process question

I bought a house 3 months ago in Utah. The basement is fully finished, but the bathroom is weird: two doors through one end (see diagram). I would like to add a wall with door. I am a computer engineer but have not done anything but minor electrical rework before (dimmer switch, ceiling fan, etc- that did not require permits).

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To do this, I'd have to move the light and fan switch, and the GFCI outlet by the sink. I would just remove the old switches, splice (with wire nuts) cable to go over the door in the new wall, down to the new location (leaving a solid plate over the old junction box), and into new jbox with switches.

The question: The bathroom is in occasional use (theater room is adjacent). What are the steps I should follow so the lights/fan can be used, but leave it available for the electrical inspection? Do I leave cable hanging out of the old jbox with the switches still connected, with cable sticking out the new jbox unattached? Do I actually disconnect the old switches, splice, and connect to new switches? What???

General question: If I have a permit, say, for remodel of the bathroom (as described), a new 3-way switch in the theatre room (by the door), and some work on the outside of the bathroom (kitchen area) - work that might take me several days to complete: can I actually use any of the new wiring until after it is inspected? If not, does the new work have to be powered down (breaker off) after I complete things before the inspection?

Or, perhaps better said: what state does my electrical rework have to be in for the inspection? I certainly would not complete everything and sheetrock the new wall before getting inspection, but I don't know what the expectation/requirement is.

Biggest thanks!
 
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Old 10-14-13, 04:43 PM
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First of all, do you know if the current bathroom & theater room was inspected & approved when they were built? You don't want to apply for a permit to modify it if it's not on record in the first place. That could open a can of worms.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 04:47 PM
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You know, I don't know. I was thinking of going down to city hall and pulling the old permits to see. Is there something in what you see that gives you reason to think there might not be permits, or are you just going on the fact that 80%-90% of people don't pull permits for basement finishing?

Isn't having unpermitted non-minor construction itself an issue?
 
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Old 10-14-13, 06:30 PM
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Suggestion: How about installing a pocket door? That way you would not need to relocate the switches (or maybe just move them down a bit) and only need to move the GFCI down the wall a little.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 06:38 PM
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Yeah, we thought about a pocket door. But our last house had one on the Master Bath and we never really liked it. I also understand that it is somewhat tricky to get them aligned properly.

Although that would solve the relocation of the switches in the bathroom, I was asking a general question with that as an example. I do have some outlets to add, some to move, and some switches to install - all unrelated to the bathroom remodel. So the question remains: after I get the permit, and start work (in my spare time), 1) at what stage do I stop work so the inspection can happen? 2) Can these circuits be used while in the process before inspection?

Thanks.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 07:06 PM
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1) Most cases you get two inspections with a permit. Rough in and finial. You get the rough in after you are finished installing everything electrical but before any insulation or Sheetrock is installed. The final is when it is all done.

2) Yes, you can heat up the circuits you need so you can work/live.

You may want to contact the inspector or take some before pictures to show the work you did not do. Most cases they will not hold you to any work you did not perform unless it is a hazard.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 09:26 PM
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So, this is a remodel - everything except the new wall is already sheetrocked. What I do with the new wall is clear to me. What I do with the pre-existing stuff is not so clear. Particularly in terms of rough and final.

For the switches I would be moving: I won't have to cut open any sheet rock near the junction box, but only at the ceiling so I can fish the new cable up from the old box, then into the new wall. So would I go ahead on splice the new cable to the wires where the old switches were - and cover with a blank wall plate, and leave the other wall open?


In another place, I am adding an outlet by connecting to a pre-existing outlet. Again, a hole in the ceiling to fish the cable to the original outlet box and connected to the wires in it. But the new outlet only needs a new box, an outlet, and plate. Do I leave the ceiling hole open for inspection? But otherwise connect the new outlet?

Similarly, I'm adding a 3-way switch: swap out a 1-way dimmer for 3-way dimmer, splice some a cable (for the runners) to the new 3-way switch location/box. Everything is behind the walls/ceiling except the new switch [except for the same hole in the ceiling I already mentioned]. Just leave the hole open so inspector can see inside?

You can see why I'm having trouble differentiating between rough and final.

Thanks for the advice about photos of the pre-existing work. But again, it's all behind sheetrock now (before I arrived on the scene). But one question: the kitchen is supposed to have two 20A small appliance branch circuits feeding the outlets above the counter. These are already wired with 14/3 and 15A breakers. I have to make some changes to those circuits. For one, the DW and disposal are tied to one of these lines and I want to pull a separate line* for them. I also need to extend off the end and add two more outlets on a peninsula (one on end and one 6ft from that). Do I have to upgrade to 12/3 and 20A breakers? (ouch!)

I'm trying to ask about general questions, not specific details for everything I'm wanting to do.

Thanks.

*This is one of the things that I will likely get a licensed electrician to do since it involves connecting to the breaker box.
 
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Old 10-15-13, 04:33 AM
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Jimboha. that's correct. Most people don't apply for permits. Once you start to talk, to the building dept, anything can happen.
 
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