Knob and Tube Rewire


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Old 10-15-13, 03:50 PM
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Wink Knob and Tube Rewire

Am involved with remodeling a 20's-30's Arts and Craft home in Ohio. We are planning to open the kitchen and dining area with a bar and have to reroute the knob and tube wiring in a section of the wall that that we are going to remove. Basically the house is primary wired - to all the bedrooms, living and dining room with K/T. The other rooms have been "updated" with two wire romex. The panel box is 60 amp with 15 amp breakers.
My question is how to connect to the power and neutral with romex in the wall - of course the neutral and power being separate wires are running between different bays. So the power source would have to be connected in one bay and the neutral would have to be connected elsewhere. The romex then would be able to have a home run back to the panel. This brings me to my second "question". Since I have both the main bathroom and kitchen walls open I would like to upgrade at least those rooms so they can grounded and have "effective" GFCI's . If I put in a 150 or 200 amp panel box with ground - so that the new wire I run in the K/B will be to code, can I hook up the existing 60 amp box as a subpanel?
As a side note I would like to rewire the whole house but with a concrete basement ceiling over a garage - in a two story house the first story is sort of "closed in" to running wires in open bays. Does anyone know of any "new' equipment out there that can aid a person undertaking such a project
Thanks, any suggestions and/or advice would be most welcome.
 
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Old 10-15-13, 04:45 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Without seeing how the house is built and laid out it would be tough to give exact suggestions but here are some things that may help.

Rather then trying to keep the K&T it would be best to abandon as much as you can. Code does not allow you to extend any K&T circuits.
Any splice you make to the existing K&T must be in a permanently accessible junction box.
You may relocate your main electrical service from the 60 amp, to a new 150/200 amp panel, and then feed the 60 amp panel with a new circuit making it a sub panel. All ground rules must be followed.
Rewiring an entire house can be done, but it is a big job and many cases you will have to open many walls to get the cables between floors.

Just for FYI - GFCIs and AFCIs do not require a ground to work properly.
 
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Old 10-15-13, 04:54 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Am involved with remodeling a 20's-30's Arts and Craft home in Ohio. We are planning to open the kitchen and dining area with a bar and have to reroute the knob and tube wiring in a section of the wall that that we are going to remove. Basically the house is primary wired - to all the bedrooms, living and dining room with K/T. The other rooms have been "updated" with two wire romex.
"Romex®" is the trademark protected brand of the Non-Metallic Building Wire (Type NM cable) originated in 1922 by the former Rome Wire Company, and now owned by Southwire. That said, many people refer to all Type NM as "Romex." It isn't, of course, just as all refrigerators aren't "Fridges" and all soft drinks aren't "Cokes."

Quick question: Is the newer cable actually 2-wire, without a ground wire, or is it 2-conductor, 3-wire cable, with two insulated (black and white) conductors and a third, bare wire for grounding?

But to get to your questions:

My question is how to connect to the power and neutral with romex in the wall - The romex then would be able to have a home run back to the panel.
To be safe and in compliance with adopted code, all electrical splices must be made inside approved, covered electrical boxes which are accessible. This can be done with K&T conductors, but it's tricky and time-consuming. For that reason, most people just replace the wiring with new cable.

of course the neutral and power being separate wires are running between different bays. So the power source would have to be connected in one bay and the neutral would have to be connected elsewhere.
That's unusual. It's more common to see the two conductors run along the opposite sides of one framing bay. If you're going to keep it in service, you will have to find a place where both old conductors can be brought into one box for splicing to the new cable.

This brings me to my second "question". Since I have both the main bathroom and kitchen walls open I would like to upgrade at least those rooms so they can grounded and have "effective" GFCI's.
GFCI protection does not require or rely on the presence of an equipment grounding conductor. That said, you should replace all outdated wiring in your house with modern material, and add GFCI and AFCI protection where each is required.

If I put in a 150 or 200 amp panel box with ground - so that the new wire I run in the K/B will be to code, can I hook up the existing 60 amp box as a subpanel? ... The panel box is 60 amp with 15 amp breakers.
If it will meet current requirements, sure. I'm guessing that you're asking about options that might be available if you hire a professional electrician to upgrade your service. That's rarely a DIY job.


As a side note I would like to rewire the whole house but with a concrete basement ceiling over a garage - in a two story house the first story is sort of "closed in" to running wires in open bays. Does anyone know of any "new' equipment out there that can aid a person undertaking such a project
Can you describe what you have a little better? A basement ceiling over a garage is hard to visualize.
 
 

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