GFCI - wasted money, grandfathered replacement?

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  #1  
Old 10-16-13, 01:51 PM
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GFCI - wasted money, grandfathered replacement?

I replaced 6 worn outlets in my garage with GFCI to the tune of 75 bucks.

Then someone told me that since GFCI's werent in the code when the house was built that I could have just replaced with standard duplex's. They found it funny that I spent all that money on outlets that wont hardly ever be used.

What do you think?
 
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Old 10-16-13, 02:03 PM
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You have six circuits in your garage?
 
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Old 10-16-13, 02:24 PM
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I would think your safety would be worth $75?

You would only need 1 GFI per circuit.
 
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Old 10-16-13, 02:26 PM
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You only need one GFCI per circuit. Yep, you overbought. Even though it wasn't code, the safety factor you have with GFCI's can't be measured in money, OK? Install your GFCI as the first receptacle in line from the breaker panel, then run the other regular receptacles from the LOAD side of the GFCI. That way all the receptacles downline are protected with just a single GFCI.
 
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Old 10-16-13, 03:01 PM
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The code requires that when replacing receptacles that would require GFI protection under the current code you need to provide GFI protection. The grandfathering is out the door.

One GFI could have protected the entire circuit if wired properly.
 
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Old 10-16-13, 06:39 PM
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I must have made a mistake putting GFCI's at each outlet.

But the outlets are not fed from the load side or in the same conduit. There are junction boxes in the attic space which had 12/2 dropping to each outlet. Because of the age of the wiring I didnt want to disturb those boxes.

I suppose a GFCI breaker was one option but I didnt want everything in garage on GFCI.

What am I missing? How should I have wired this then?
 
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Old 10-16-13, 07:18 PM
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Everyone assumed that the receptacles were wired in a row. What you did is perfectly fine.
 
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Old 10-16-13, 09:02 PM
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But the outlets are not fed from the load side or in the same conduit. There are junction boxes in the attic space which had 12/2 dropping to each outlet. Because of the age of the wiring I didnt want to disturb those boxes.

I suppose a GFCI breaker was one option but I didnt want everything in garage on GFCI.
Maybe I'm just not understanding something clearly.

Any and every receptacle in a garage must have GFCI protection. Are there load(s) in your garage that don't need it and that you'd rather not have protected, that would only have GFCI protection if you installed the breaker?

If you're saying that you'd rather not have all of the receptacles on the same GFCI protection device, so that a problem with one tool or other load can kill just one of the receptacles while the others stay on, that makes a lot of sense.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 03:13 AM
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With your wiring arranged the way it is you had to install a GFI at every location.
 
  #10  
Old 10-17-13, 05:51 AM
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THanks I already knew that I had no choice with the outlets, I wished I could have wired off the load side like folks assumed. My question was about the grandfathering of old outlets but I know that answer now too.

In regards to the inquiry about the breaker:

If I installed gfci breaker then the lighting and garage door would be on it.

The garage is also controlled by tandem breakers so eventhough I didnt price the breakers, I would guess the breakers would be the same or if not more in cost than the 6 outlets.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 09:51 AM
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You cannot buy a GFI tandem. The are all full size.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 10:50 AM
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If I installed gfci breaker then the lighting and garage door would be on it.
While the lights don't need GFCI protection, I assume that your garage door opener plugs into a receptacle. If so, that receptacle requires GFCI protection.

Originally Posted by Nashkat1
Any and every receptacle in a garage must have GFCI protection.
If that receptacle is mounted in the ceiling, the GFCI protection must be provided on the wires feeding it - the test and reset features must be accessible without requiring that you climb a ladder.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 04:00 PM
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Your right, 2008 NEC calls for GFCI on GDO. My area hasnt adopted 2008 I dont think so I think the GDO counts as being "not readily accesible".... but then I think I get bit by the replacement must be GFCI clause... I cant win.

So what is the code reference for the requirement about it being accesible without a ladder though?


(This is where the thread could morph into a debate whether GFCI should be a refrigerators, sump pumps and freezers)
 
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Old 10-17-13, 04:28 PM
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So what is the code reference for the requirement about it being accesible without a ladder though?
I don't remember offhand and I don't have my copy with me. Maybe pcboss or one of the other pros can give you that.

I thing it's just the standard part about all overcurrent protection devices being accessible. Common sense anyway - don't want to fool with fixing a fault from a ladder.

(This is where the thread could morph into a debate whether GFCI should be a refrigerators, sump pumps and freezers)
It could but it won't. We already had that one.
 
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Old 10-17-13, 08:01 PM
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(This is where the thread could morph into a debate whether GFCI should be a refrigerators, sump pumps and freezers)
The 2008 NEC requires GFCI protection for those items already if in a garage or unfinished basement.
 
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