Replacing electric cooktop

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  #1  
Old 10-20-13, 12:15 PM
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Replacing electric cooktop

I had an old electric cooktop that needed to be replaced.

I have a new Whirlpool WCC31430A cooktop. The installation manual specifies that "a 4-wire or 3-wire, single phase, 240 volt, 60 Hz., AC only electrical supply is required on a separate, 40-amp circuit, fused on both sides of the line."

Trouble is, old cooktop was wired together with the wall oven on one 30 amp 220 circuit.

Am I right that I need to add a 40A 240 circuit to the panel and run a separate line for the new cooktop? Other forums have indicated that there were exceptions to wire wall oven and cooktop together in the past, but manufacturers instructions always trump code. I do have a number of empty slots in my 100A panel and an unfinished basement, so running the new will not be a big deal.

My locality allows homeowners to pull permits even if they aren't licensed electricians (and I own the house). Is this a safe DIY job if I pull permit and get it inspected? I'd appreciate any safety tips, since I'm a little nervous about touching the main panel. I've replaced switches, fixtures, recepts, etc. but never touched a main panel.

And... when I get the local electrical inspector in I'm afraid he will complain about the _rest_ of my kitchen wiring since I'm pretty sure it's not done to modern standards (no GFI's for example plus I am suspicious the fellow I bought the house from wired without pulling permits). Can the inspector get me in trouble for something outside the scope of the current project?

Thanks for your help. If you guys tell me I need an electrician, I will just do that. But I'd like to save the money and time spent getting bids and waiting on the electricians schedule etc. My wife wants her stove back.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-20-13, 12:21 PM
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Am I right that I need to add a 40A 240 circuit to the panel and run a separate line for the new cooktop?
That's what I would do, may as well start somewhere doing things right. You'll need 8-3 w/G NM cable and a 40A 2P breaker.

when I get the local electrical inspector in I'm afraid he will complain about the _rest_ of my kitchen wiring since I'm pretty sure it's not done to modern standards (no GFI's for example plus I am suspicious the fellow I bought the house from wired without pulling permits). Can the inspector get me in trouble for something outside the scope of the current project?
Why don't you go ahead and install the proper GFCI receptacles before you bring the inspector in, you should have them anyway. I wouldn't worry too much about the previous owner's lack of permits, he's history.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-13, 12:39 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

When you apply for a permit and the inspector comes to inspect the work..... he's there to inspect and sign off on the work that was declared in the permit.

They can and sometimes do make recommendations based on what they see. He will point out anything he sees that is unsafe.
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-13, 12:39 PM
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I know i should do the GFIs anyway. Since you said I should do that, here's a note on that project. I can put this in a separate thread if needed.

A weird thing the last guy did: when he wanted to go from 2-prong to 3-prong outlets he ran ground wires from each outlet down to clamps on the iron water pipes in the basement. So the outlets "test" as grounded...

Wiring that is there is 12g old romex copper wire, in really nice shape but with no ground wire in the cable. The outlets do not feed off each other. I am considering GFI breakers on the countertop circuits and removing the weird ground wires. I read that if a GFI is there, the 3rd ground wire is not needed. I can't remember how many countertop circuits are needed, I have 2 right now and the dishwasher is on one of them - need to split that off.
 
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Old 10-20-13, 12:44 PM
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Thanks PJmax - I'm thinking now that having the inspector come in could help me make some changes in other areas, hopefully without getting me in trouble (fines). There are definitely a bunch of issues to have cleaned up.
 
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Old 10-20-13, 04:57 PM
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A weird thing the last guy did: when he wanted to go from 2-prong to 3-prong outlets he ran ground wires from each outlet down to clamps on the iron water pipes in the basement. So the outlets "test" as grounded...
I am considering GFI breakers on the countertop circuits and removing the weird ground wires. I read that if a GFI is there, the 3rd ground wire is not needed.
That was almost right, but not quite. Do not remove the ground wire from the receptacles. Remove it from the water pipe connection and extend it to your electric panel ground/neutral bus, then install your GFI breaker. The 3rd ground wire always is safer, even if the circuit is GFI protected. The GFI breaker does not take the place of a ground.
 
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Old 10-21-13, 04:23 AM
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Thanks guys for the helpful advice. I slept on this and decided I'm going to call my friendly local electrician... I think I could probably do this myself but I might miss something important.
 
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