GFCI Continuity Question

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  #1  
Old 10-20-13, 03:10 PM
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GFCI Continuity Question

I am building a box made of treated lumber to serve as an outside light fixture. I am wiring the box before taking it outside and connecting it. From bottom to top, it includes - a junction box, a GFCI outlet with cover, switch, and light fixture.

To avoid problems later, I have been trying to determine whether everything is connected properly. I am trying to use my multimeter to test continuity. With the switch in the ON position: One probe connects to the bottom black wire, the other to the top black wire. No result. Same result for neutral. For what it's worth, ground shows continuity.

I rechecked the GFCI outlet, thinking a wire came loose. But no, they all seem connected. Can one check continuity like this with a GFCI in the circuit? Is there something about a non-powered GFCI that prevents this? Or should I keep checking for loose wires?
 

Last edited by jeffporter; 10-20-13 at 04:12 PM.
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  #2  
Old 10-20-13, 04:25 PM
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A GFCI comes tripped and will not reset till sufficient voltage is present. Normally an outside light is not protected by a GFCI.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-13, 05:28 PM
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Thank you for your help! In all honesty, I mimicked the wiring of a fixture I am building to replace, thus the GFCI.
 
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Old 10-20-13, 06:12 PM
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If there is a receptacle it does need to be protected but that can either be at the receptacle or downstream of the receptacle. Just guessing you meany receptacle since you wrote GFCI outlet which might not mean receptacle.
 
  #5  
Old 10-21-13, 09:06 AM
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I suppose I meant receptacle - might use it to plug in a low-voltage light system. Again, thanks. You saved me a lot of grief.
 
  #6  
Old 10-21-13, 11:45 AM
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I suppose I meant receptacle
An outlet is simply a place where power can be accessed. Lights, switches and recptacles are three examples. A receptacle is where you plug something in.
 
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