outlet looped thru switch

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  #1  
Old 11-03-13, 03:46 AM
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outlet looped thru switch

Line goes to switch but is looped (not pigtailed) over to a GFCI next to it. So when load is plugged in, Im assuming it goes thru the switch screw....

It would be hard for me to pigtail it and I think box fill might be an issue if I open it up. I have a book that shows that as OK but thats from outlet to outlet... I never seen it from a switch to a receptical....

Is this acceptable or am I setting the switch up for failure?

If it makes a difference... this setup is in the kitchen feeding oversink light and outlet.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-03-13, 03:58 AM
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Kitchen lights under current code should not be on a counter top receptacle but it may be grandfathered. As to the connection it is okay the way it is. Note most GFCIs accept two wires under each side wired terminal so it could probably be rewired without pigtailing.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 03:59 AM
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Small appliance receptacles can't power anything else, so strike one. The GFCI is feeding the switch, which in normal circumstances would not present a problem. Does the power go to the GFCI first, or to the switch? Odd if it were to go to the switch first.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 04:02 AM
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Goes to switch first.

Its in a 60 yo house, so current codes out the door.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 10:20 AM
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As Ray said, although it goes to the switch first and continues to the GFCI, there is no break in the current when the switch is turned off. That is fine, considering the age. GFCI's have multiple holes in the LINE and LOAD side. From the switch, the wire should be connected to the LINE side of the GFCI for it to work properly. The lights will not have any GFCI protection, which, is fine, too.

If we sidestepped your question, let us know. We try to answer based on the question, but sometimes don't understand fully what you want to do.
 
  #6  
Old 11-03-13, 11:09 AM
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That appears to be like my configuation too at my sink. I wondered the same thing since the switch would be under the same load as the outlet.....
 
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