New garage gas/electrical needs

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Old 11-03-13, 10:41 AM
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New garage gas/electrical needs

Planning on building a new garage. Would like to install gas heater. Is it economical and possible to bury a poly gas line from my house along with electrical lines?

Is it recommended to install a 100 amp box for most workshop uses?
 
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Old 11-03-13, 10:49 AM
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You can use direct-bury yellow poly tubing and convert to metal risers at the ends.

The size of the service depends on the distance and the load of your connected devices.
Usually 60A is sufficient.

As far as in the trench..... I believe the electric and gas need to be separated by 12".
 
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Old 11-03-13, 01:27 PM
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Is it economical and possible to bury a poly gas line from my house along with electrical lines?
Gas and electric supply piping can usually go in the same trench. Permission to do that, and the requirements for their separation, will be available from your local permitting office.

A typical requirement would be that each supply be buried at its required depth and that the two supplies be separated at least 12" horizontally.

Is it recommended to install a 100 amp box for most workshop uses?
No. What will the total load be?
 
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Old 11-03-13, 02:41 PM
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Thanks for your replies.

I understand the trenching seperation and relate to code issues.

As far as total load for electrical service, I have no idea what load I need. Kind of looking for future needs a little when ever I sell the house. I dont weld, but I dont know what that would require if I wanted to later on. I would have some basic woodworking tools like table saw, upright drills. I dont know what could use 240v so not plan on that.

Planning on basic workshop. No heavy duty car repairs or welding.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 03:18 PM
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Based on your description of future load, you might be able to get away with a 20A multiwire branch circuit (2 hots & 1 neutral + ground) or a 30 A subpanel. 40A would certainly be adequate and 60A more than adequate. To be more certain about how much power you need, you'll need to do a residential load calculation. There are a number of tools available online to do that with. I like the one from Mike Holt, FWIW.

A MWBC is a lot easier to install than any subpanel.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 03:20 PM
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60 amps to a subpanel would be a lot for woodworking. Think of it this way, there are still houses that have no more than a 60 amp service....total. I'd go with either a 50 or 60 amp subpanel.
 
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Old 11-04-13, 11:47 AM
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Thanks for the advice. I know absolutely nothing about running electrical service to a garage. I had a builder ask me if I was doing any welding and I said no so he said 60 amp would be fine. That is all I knew. I just figured welding certainly needed like 100 amps.

At any rate, I can now not appear so clueless in discussing my electrical needs.
Thanks for all your feedback.
 
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