Splitting a 240V line into a 120V?

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Old 11-07-13, 10:32 AM
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Splitting a 240V line into a 120V?

Since this is my first post, hello I suppose.

I would like to purchase an 1800W toaster oven to use in lieu of my standard oven for the most part as it is large and slow to heat. All of my circuits in my kitchen are 15A circuits and from what I've gathered, it's not very safe to run a 1800W device on a 15A circuit. However I don't want to disconnect the stove completely, I'd like the option to use either or. Speaking with an electrical associate at Home Depot they stated that you can split a 240V circuit to 120V, that this was used for range hoods and that I could potentially use this in my situation. Could someone elaborate on this and give an opinion on to whether this is an intelligent solution to my predicament?
 
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Old 11-07-13, 10:58 AM
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Whether it's legal anymore I can't say. I don't think so since I believe range hoods now require their own circuit, though I may be thinking of over the range microwaves. Don't quote me on either one.

Before you can even think of splitting it, is it 3 or 4 wire...if 3, you won't be able to do it as you have no ground.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 10:59 AM
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How would I check something like that?
 
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Old 11-07-13, 11:28 AM
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Jthe stove will typically be a 40 or 50 amp circuit. General receptacles cannot on a circuit larger than 20 amps under the NEC. I am sure the CEC has a similar rule.

A 1800 watt unit is 15 amps at 120 volts.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 11:47 AM
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Speaking with an electrical associate at Home Depot they stated that you can split a 240V circuit to 120V
They were wrong. A 240 volt circuit consists of only two wires, each side is 240 volts. No way to split it. A stove circuit typically is not 240 though. It is 120/240. You could use the 120 part of the stove circuit but only if it was fused for a suitable amperage. If the stove circuit has a ground you could connect it to a subpanel or use the wiring to run a 120 volt circuit.

All of my circuits in my kitchen are 15A circuits
Are you sure. Kitchen countertop circuits have been required to be 20 amps for many years. Does the oven actually have a 120 volt 20 amp plug? That would be very unusual for a home appliance.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 12:19 PM
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The OP is in Canada where I believe they used to allow 15 amp kitchen circuits.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 06:49 PM
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Are you sure. Kitchen countertop circuits have been required to be 20 amps for many years. Does the oven actually have a 120 volt 20 amp plug? That would be very unusual for a home appliance.
The OP is in Canada where I believe they used to allow 15 amp kitchen circuits.
Correct, I believe this changed in 2007 up here, so certainly this house does not have any. All the wiring is 14-2 from what I see, so I can't just stick one in either. That's why I'm trying to find a way to get additional power because even though 15A is 1800W it doesn't seem smart to push the circuit to 100% capacity like that.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 08:40 PM
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The circuit should be fine even at 100% loading.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 09:20 PM
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even though 15A is 1800W it doesn't seem smart to push the circuit to 100% capacity like that.
A 15A circuit is built to supply an 1800W load at 120V unless that load is continuous. You're not planning to run your toaster oven for more than 3 hours at a time, are you?
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 11-07-13 at 10:11 PM.
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