100 amp wire


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Old 11-10-13, 03:21 AM
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100 amp wire

I recently had my home service upgraded to 200amps. I have a 60 amp line to my garage and would like to increase it to 100amps. My electrician has told me that the wires from my mast to the garage are sufficient for 100 amps. However I have to change the indoor wire that run from my new 100amp circuit breaker in my 200amp panel to the connection box in my basement where the outdoor mast wire is connected. I have already changed my panel in the garage to support 100 amps.

I'm running 240V to the garage. Is 6-3 wire okay from my 100 amp circuit breaker to the mast wire? Am I better to run conduit and use single wires? If so what type of wire? Thanks.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 03:48 AM
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Why do you need 100 amps at the garage? #6 is only good for 60 amps.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 05:30 AM
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I need 100amps because of electric tools I will be using. If 6awg isn't right, is 4awg what I need?
 
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Old 11-10-13, 05:38 AM
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Also can I simply run two 6awg lines from my fuse panel and hook together where mast wire connects? ie 120 amp protection???
 
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Old 11-10-13, 05:59 AM
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You cannot parallel conductors that small. Two conductors connected to a 60 amp fuse or breaker would still be 60 amps. You do not add them together.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 06:21 AM
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My electrician has told me that the wires from my mast to the garage are sufficient for 100 amps.
That would be the aerial quadplex, probably about a #4 aluminum. Should be 3 insulated and 1 bare.

However I have to change the indoor wire that run from my new 100amp circuit breaker in my 200amp panel to the connection box in my basement where the outdoor mast wire is connected.
What size and type wire runs up the mast, it must be rated for the 100 amps and cannot be the same aerial quadplex. The same at the garage, the wire from the garage connection to the aerial and on into the new 100 amp panel must be rated for the 100 amps. The aerial quadplex can only be run at a reduced size through the air.

If 6awg isn't right, is 4awg what I need?
I would use #3.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 08:12 AM
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I need 100amps because of electric tools I will be using.j
What tools require that much? Are you going to be running a plasma cutter while someone is using a larger welder and a 100 gallon compressor is running? If so then you made need a 200 amp feed to the house to supply 100 amps to the garage. Tell us the tools you will be using.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 09:51 AM
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My electrician who upgraded me to a 200amp supply in my house suggested that I should upgrade my 60 amp to the garage to 100amp. Why does it matter what I am using to draw the amperage? My aerial quadplex is rated for 100amps and I just need the wire to run from my 100amp breaker to the aerial quadplex wire.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 10:09 AM
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Good enough. We just try to keep the cost down if possible. As stated earlier you will need a minimum of #3* copper from your breaker box to your mast for the garage and #8 for the ground.

*Sometimes with distances of 5 feet or less one size smaller is allowed IIRC.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 12:14 PM
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Why does it matter what I am using to draw the amperage?
Because unless you have some pretty heavy home machinery and expect several people to be workiing on that machinery at the same time, you don't have enough load to warrant 100 amps unless you just want it and don't mind paying the price. 60 amps is literally TONS of power for most home shops and some small commercial shops.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 01:12 PM
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Thanks. So I should go with 3 avg copper for the three live wires and 8 avg for the ground
 
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Old 11-10-13, 03:14 PM
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Thanks. So I should go with 3 avg copper for the three live wires and 8 avg for the ground
Yes, that is correct. Of course if you have trouble finding #3 you can go with #2 copper or #1 aluminum.
 
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Old 11-10-13, 07:28 PM
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So I should go with 3 avg copper for the three live wires and 8 avg for the ground
If you want to spend the money and time to supply more power to your garage than you are likely to be able to use there, then yes, those are the proper size copper conductors to use to do that.
 
 

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