Wiring powermate 4000 3 prong 240V generator to home

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  #1  
Old 11-11-13, 03:00 PM
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Wiring powermate 4000 3 prong 240V generator to home

I Have a coleman Powermate maxa 4000 generator

I would like to it use for home backup ( adapting it to a L14-20 inlet at house) and then connecting it to my main electrical panel (with interlock switch)

My problem is: how to run my wiring using 240V / NEMA-6-15 receptacle . (not sure 3 wires, 2 hot,1 ground ). "no neutral, 4th wire."

Option #1 (sounds the easiest)
Can I construct a extension cord that has the NEMA 6-15 three wire plug so that it works with a NEMA L14-20 plug at the other end?
"and would it be safe for my well motor, appliances, computer, television, etc."


My Option #2 ( i believe it has a bonded neutral).
I believe I can perform the update to my generator "see attached url under coleman 5000, similar to mine Portable generator neutral rewiring thus, using the "L14-20" setup for the future.
by removing the generator bonding ,and changing out the 240 volt outlet for a 4 pin L14-20R.

but is removing the jumper safe? "and would it be safe for my well motor, appliances, computer, television, etc."

Asking for advice. in simple terms please .

need to know safest way , "don't want to fry anything…"




From generator plate:
4000run /5000max watt generator
RPM 3600, Phase-single,
power factor-1,
Duty-Cont., insul CI-F,
Amps 33.3/ 16.7

AC Output power 120/240/ VAC 60Hz

Output receptacles
(1) 120v 15 amp Duplex / nema 5-15R
(1) 240v 15 amp Duplex / nema 6-15R




From manual
120 V, 20 Ampere Duplex Receptacle
This duplex is split so that 20 amps of current may be
drawn from each half of the receptacle. However, total power
drawn must be kept within nameplate ratings. These
receptacles may be used along with the 240 volt receptacle
provided the generator is not overloaded.

Circuit Breakers
The receptacles are protected by an AC circuit breaker.

240 V, 15 Ampere Duplex Receptacle
A maximum of 15 amps may be drawn from these
receptacles provided they are the only receptacles used.
However, current must be limited to the nameplate rating.
If these receptacles are used along with the 120 volt
receptacles, the total load drawn must not exceed the
nameplate ratings.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-11-13, 04:02 PM
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You have way to small a generator to power much more then a few lights a ref and maybe a sump pump.
Really sure you want to spend all that money, and time?
Once you see how little it will power and buy a larger one it will have to all be rewired.
 
  #3  
Old 11-11-13, 04:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Option #1: No.

Option #2: I see nothing wrong with taping off the neutral of the 120 volt receptacles as long everything is the same as the one in the link.

However, you are still limited to the output of the generator, which is 4000 watts max, or about 16 amps. Not much to run an entire house.
 
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Old 11-11-13, 06:07 PM
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However, you are still limited to the output of the generator, which is 4000 watts max, or about 16 amps. Not much to run an entire house.
I have run my whole house except for the range, dryer, and outdoor Christmas/Halloween displays off either my Generac 4000EXL or Generac LP3250 generators.
 
  #5  
Old 11-11-13, 07:01 PM
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Option #2 answer sounds good to me: "I see nothing wrong with taping off the neutral of the 120 volt receptacles as long everything is the same as the one in the link."

here's my plan, at the generator:

removing the neutral/ground generator bonding wire and,

(1) connect the 2 hots, to the 2 hots the L14-20 receptacle.
(2) connect the white the 120v generator receptacle from the to the neutral to the L14-20 receptacle.
(3) connect my ground to the generator frame and run it to the ground to the L14-20 receptacle.

would I be good to go with this?
"and would it be safe for my well motor, appliances, computer, television, etc."

also,

I know using only the 240V line would only give me 16.7 watts, I figure most of my needs would only require me using my 120v lines, witch would double my amps for 16.7 to 33.3. I don't intend to power my whole house, just selecting circuits of importance as needed.


The tables below should reflect my amp/watt output,
the generator shows 4000run /5000max watts.

Running watts:
At 240 volts, 4000 watts = 16.667 amps.
At 120 volts, 4000 watts = 33.333 amps.

5000 maximum
At 240 volts, 4000 watts = 20.8 amps.
At 120 volts, 5000 watts = 41. 6 amps.

are they correct?
 
  #6  
Old 11-11-13, 07:39 PM
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The running watts is what you need to go by. The max watts is for things that draw a lot of start up current such as motors. It is not for a constant load.

You are doubling your amps because of the 240 volts. You can't draw 33 amps on one leg of the 240 or your breaker/fuse on the generator will trip. The fuses/breaker on the generator will be 15 or 20 amps. Mainly pay attention to the watts and make sure to balance the load between both legs of the 240 volts. That will be the key.

would I be good to go with this?
"and would it be safe for my well motor, appliances, computer, television, etc."
The well motor worries me a little because of the start up current I mentioned. The computer and TV should be fine depending on how "clean" the power is of the generator.
 
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