Is it ok to move an outlet this way?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-12-13, 02:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
Is it ok to move an outlet this way?

Hi All,

I have an outlet in the garage ceiling that I need to move to the wall. Instead of dealing with running it through the wall, I thought I'd add an outlet extender to the existing outlet then run conduit over to the wall and add the outlet.

Is there anything wrong with doing that?

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-12-13, 02:37 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
No restriction unless the receptacle is a dedicated circuit for a garage door opener. I wouldn't see a problem with it. Make sure you secure your conduit properly and use the proper connections.
 
  #3  
Old 11-12-13, 02:45 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
Thanks Larry.

It is the garage door opener outlet, but it is being moved to the wall for the new garage door opener, is that ok?

Also, I can't use romex in the conduit correct? If not, what do you call the wire I should use so I can research, and how would I determine the correct size? I don't want to have to trust the guy at the home store, Thanks!
 
  #4  
Old 11-12-13, 03:22 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 11,979
You can use romex in conduit, but it can be a pain to install it. If you can keep the bends to just one or two you should be Ok with 1/2" EMT or 3/4" PVC conduit. Wire size should be the same as what it is in the original box.

If you want to use individual wires (best option IMO) you need THHN. If you use PVC you are required to pull in a Green/bare ground wire.
 
  #5  
Old 11-12-13, 03:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
awesome thanks!

what about this bit "It is the garage door opener outlet, but it is being moved to the wall for the new garage door opener, is that ok?"
 
  #6  
Old 11-12-13, 03:31 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,212
Also, I can't use romex in the conduit correct? If not, what do you call the wire I should use so I can research, and how would I determine the correct size? I don't want to have to trust the guy at the home store, Thanks!
It's best to use individual conductors such as Type THHN in conduit. Use 12 awg for a 20 amp circuit or 14 awg for a 15 amp circuit.
 
  #7  
Old 11-12-13, 03:45 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,354
It will also need GFI protection.
 
  #8  
Old 11-12-13, 04:07 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
what about this bit "It is the garage door opener outlet, but it is being moved to the wall for the new garage door opener, is that ok?"
Yes, that's fine............................
 
  #9  
Old 11-12-13, 05:22 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Never seen a sideways garage door opener, but I haven't been to the moon, either. Wall application is fine.
 
  #10  
Old 11-12-13, 05:50 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 11,979
I'm guessing it is a GDO that attaches to the torsion bar of the garage door.
 
  #11  
Old 11-13-13, 06:16 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
I hadn't seen a wall mount either, but apparently they are common for large heavy single doors.

It's best to use individual conductors such as Type THHN in conduit. Use 12 awg for a 20 amp circuit or 14 awg for a 15 amp circuit.
Thanks!

It will also need GFI protection.
Assuming it already does, will I be able to extend that like I'm trying to do then use a GFI outlet?
 
  #12  
Old 11-13-13, 06:17 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,212
Never seen a sideways garage door opener, but I haven't been to the moon, either
It sounds more like a commercial opener mounted adjacent to the door on the wall.
 
  #13  
Old 11-13-13, 06:20 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,636
will I be able to extend that like I'm trying to do then use a GFI outlet?
So long as the GFCI can be operated standing on the floor, yes.
 
  #14  
Old 11-13-13, 07:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
So long as the GFCI can be operated standing on the floor, yes.
I can easily make it that height once I move it, but currently it's 10ft up on the ceiling... was that not correct or would some other method have been used? (I can't see it right now or I'd provide more detail)
 
  #15  
Old 11-13-13, 07:57 AM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
currently it's 10ft up on the ceiling... was that not correct or would some other method have been used?
That was not correct and a different method should have been used.

The ceiling-mounted receptacles for garage door openers must be provided with GFCI protection, and the TEST and RESET controls for that protection must be accessible - which means no ladder. Feeding those receptacles from a GFCI receptacle mounted at standard height in the garage or from a GFCI breaker are two commonly used methods.
 
  #16  
Old 11-16-13, 09:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
Thank you, but you stated it wasn't done correctly, and then said:

Feeding those receptacles from a GFCI receptacle mounted at standard height in the garage or from a GFCI breaker are two commonly used methods.
That could be how it's done now right?? I'm not there to see, but I would assume it was up to code, it's a newer home.

If it was done correctly, is it still ok for me to extend it as per my original plan?
 
  #17  
Old 11-16-13, 09:33 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,354
The extension is fine. The issue was the ceiling mounted GFI.
 
  #18  
Old 11-16-13, 11:52 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 25
I see now, I had meant that the outlet is 10ft up, I'm not sure how the GFI was done at this point. Thank you!
 
  #19  
Old 11-16-13, 06:10 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,212
That could be how it's done now right?? I'm not there to see, but I would assume it was up to code, it's a newer home.
That would be a reasonable assumption, but it all really depends on the local AHJ. There are still many municipalities across the country with some inspectors that really don't do a good job because they don't know the code. Most, from my experience, do a good job, but I still run into a few that don't have a clue.

How high will the receptacle be at the new location?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'