Nicked Wire Insulation

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  #1  
Old 11-16-13, 10:29 AM
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Nicked Wire Insulation

Would a small nick in wire insulation, exposing a bit of copper be a shock hazard or a fire hazard or both?

What would happen if the exposed portion carrying current is rubbing against another wires insulation or comes in contact with the box or device in it? Would it generate heat?
 
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Old 11-16-13, 10:47 AM
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Insulation is there to keep the copper from making contact with anything but the device it is powering.
Is this nicked wire loomex (house wire)? If so, loosen the clamp on the back of the box and hopefully whoever wired it left a loop of excess wire as you are supposed to. Then you can just pull a little extra in and remove the casing.
If not, my second choice would be to replace the wire if easy enough.
If not, third choice would be to wrap some electrical tape around the nick.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 10:51 AM
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I should state this is a hypothetical question for the benefit of my greater understanding....
 
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Old 11-16-13, 11:59 AM
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It could be a shock hazard and possibly a fire hazard.
If the wire that was nicked was the black/hot wire and it touched metal..... you'd have sparks and a short.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 06:16 PM
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I would hypothetically repair the insulation.
 
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Old 11-16-13, 07:07 PM
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What is "Loomex?" Do you mean Romex?
Andy
 
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Old 11-16-13, 07:19 PM
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Loomex/Romex/NMD90 = Same thing.
 
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Old 11-17-13, 05:52 AM
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Loomex/NMD90 = Same thing.
Not exactly the same thing, but very similar.

Loomex/NMD90 - Canadian = 300 volt rated

Romex/NMB - USA = 600 volt rated
 
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Old 11-17-13, 06:14 AM
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If it's just a small nick in the insulation, a small piece of heat-shrink tubing works well as an easy repair. Otherwise a piece of good quality electrical tape can work.

If the nick is significant and/or actually nicked the copper, you really should be replacing the wire.
 
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Old 11-17-13, 12:09 PM
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Joe,

Did not know that.
So in the states your resi electricians mostly use Romex on everything or is Romex for a special application?
 
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Old 11-17-13, 01:19 PM
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So in the states your resi electricians mostly use Romex on everything or is Romex for a special application?
NMB cable (aka romex) is generally used for residential work, but it isn't limited to just residential. Under some circumstances it is also used in light commercial work and sometimes motels too. Although NMB is rated at 600 volts, I can only think of one time I ever saw it used for a 480 volt circuit and I am not sure that was a legal installation (many years ago).
 
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Old 11-22-13, 12:54 PM
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What would occur if a portion of insulation was nicked or otherwise removed or damaged in the middle of a run of metal conduit?

Would excessive heating occur? Fire hazard? Or would it be a matter of it coming in contact with grounded metal and would trip the breaker? What if it was the neutral conductor?....

any thoughts?
 
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