Push In Wire Connectors and TW wire?

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  #1  
Old 11-19-13, 09:38 AM
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Push In Wire Connectors and TW wire?

I bought some 'Ideal In-Sure' Push-In Wire Connectors and was disapointed to read on the label:

"For use on insulation types TFN, TFFN, THHN, THWN, XHHW, T90 or equivilant".


That means I cannot use these with TW wire.

I wonder if that is because TW is only rated to 60C? Or is it because the TW seems to have slighty more robust/larger rubber insulation than those other types?

Do the WAGO's have this same requirement?
 
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Old 11-19-13, 09:59 AM
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I don't know what the issue would be unless it is due to the diameter of the opening. I would think stripping the proper length of conductor would allow full insertion. Perhaps the thicker insulation prevents this.

Don't know about the Wagos.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 09:39 AM
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Do you think the THWN catagory also means standard TW?

FWIW, I called both companies tech lines and they were both of NO help... first question from Wago lady "what is TW wire?". Wago stance said if it fits you can probably use them... didnt go further.

IDeal couldnt give me a reason why they dont list TW on the package but if its not on the package that means its not UL listed.....

So im thinking TW falls in the catagory of THWN??

I think I will stick to wire nuts instead.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 02:06 PM
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So im thinking TW falls in the catagory of THWN??
Probably not.

IDeal couldnt give me a reason why they dont list TW on the package but if its not on the package that means its not UL listed.....
Getting an item tested and listed by U.L. is not an inexpensive event. TW wire hasn't been used or available for use in quite a few years. My best guess is that Ideal saw no benefit to spending the money to have their connectors listed for use with TW wire.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 02:13 PM
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Is the wire made up of fine strands? This may be difficult to get into the connection without fuzzing up before it reaches the far end where it must reach to achieve a good contact.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 02:34 PM
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The spec sheet says they are good with 19 strand #14-#12.

http://www.idealindustries.com/media...h-in_32-34.pdf
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:58 PM
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Type TW is not the same as THWN. The TW is older thicker insulation.
 
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Old 11-21-13, 10:01 AM
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So I bought some of the Wagos today.

4 and 6 wire. Im intrigued by them since trying to get 6 wires under a wire nut is not possible for me.

There is no restriction about types of wires on here... in fact they dont even make mention of the types to use other than saying CU 12-18 stranded of "19 strands" or less. They also say there is a test port on them!! Its not apparent to me where this port is though. Does that mean I Can safely take voltage reading from these?

Do all the wire holes have to be used? Or can you put say 2 wires in the 4 slot connectors?

I assume these have the same reliability as a backstab connection? Do electricians use these?
 
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Old 11-21-13, 10:33 AM
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They also say there is a test port on them!! Its not apparent to me where this port is though. Does that mean I Can safely take voltage reading from these?
I would make that assumption, I am not familiar with them.

Do all the wire holes have to be used? Or can you put say 2 wires in the 4 slot connectors?
Use as many or as few holes as you wish.

I assume these have the same reliability as a backstab connection? Do electricians use these?
No, these have a much better reliability than device backstab connections. Yes, some electricians use them.
 
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Old 11-21-13, 06:09 PM
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The test port allows for voltage measurements to be taken without removing the connector.
 
  #11  
Old 11-22-13, 06:01 PM
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I was going to use one WAGO today but chickened out. I push a 12g wire into one, it actually spins around the wire! I stepped on the connector with my foot and gave the wire a tug and it popped right out. Usually cant do that with a wire nut.

I do have some of these in service right now though now that I think of it, they were preinstalled in 2 HALO can lights in my basement.
 
  #12  
Old 11-30-13, 04:29 PM
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I reluctantly had to use a wago today.

I had two outlets to change, both wires in the box were short, only about inch or two coming out of the box.

The first was just power in to outlet 2 wires, so I had to (also reluctantly) use the backwired clamps (leviton spec grade). Something I never done before.

The second outlet was power in and power out 4 wires. I wasnt going to be able to wirenut a pigtail so instead I used the a WAGO 4 port for the pigtail connection.

It feeds one more outlet ahead of it. Im leary to use those 2 outlet now!! Definetly not loading it up.....

So I only used 3 of the 4 holes in the WAGO, is that not a good idea?
 
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Old 11-30-13, 06:29 PM
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The first was just power in to outlet 2 wires, so I had to (also reluctantly) use the backwired clamps (leviton spec grade). Something I never done before.
The backwire clamps make a good solid connection, they should be fine.

So I only used 3 of the 4 holes in the WAGO, is that not a good idea?
I see nothing wrong with doing that.
 
  #14  
Old 12-01-13, 05:07 AM
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The 4 hole connector is not compromised performance-wise if you used just 2 or 3 of the holes. Some electricians don't bother to keep all the sizes in stock and use 4 (or more) hole connectors for everything.
 
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