split 20a receptacle


  #1  
Old 11-27-13, 10:19 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
split 20a receptacle

Hi, I want to install a new plug for my 2 treadmills. The treadmills are 120v, 20a. I was planning on running 12/3 bx to a 120v 20a receptacle and splitting it. Would be using a 2-pole 20a breaker as well. Is there anything wrong with this? Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 11-27-13, 11:12 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Please respond guys, need to varify this is correct
 
  #3  
Old 11-27-13, 11:15 AM
canuk's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 257
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Providing you do remove the bridge between the 2 hot terminals on the receptacle and use a 2 pole common trip 20 amp breaker you should be good to go.
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-13, 11:40 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Well aware of that. I'm concerned of running both treadmills at the same time at full load
 
  #5  
Old 11-27-13, 11:48 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
I'm concerned of running both treadmills at the same time at full load
Why? Each would be on a separate circuit. What is the actual amp draw?
 
  #6  
Old 11-27-13, 11:57 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Brain fart. Seperate phases so the neutral only sees 1phase current at a time. Thx for responses
 
  #7  
Old 11-27-13, 12:20 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,980
Received 196 Upvotes on 172 Posts
You will need to use a 20 amp duplex. A 15 amp duplex does not meet the code.

If this is in an unfinished basement you need GFI protection.
 
  #8  
Old 11-27-13, 12:54 PM
canuk's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 257
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Well aware of that. I'm concerned of running both treadmills at the same time at full load
Ah --- you weren't clear of that in your orginal question. If there was an issue it would have been pointed out in the responce.
 
  #9  
Old 11-27-13, 01:14 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
The neutral only carries the difference between the two hots. If both drew 16 amps then the load on the neutral would be 16-16=0. Even with only one running and again assuming 16 amps you would have 16-0=16 amps on the neutral.
 
  #10  
Old 11-27-13, 03:57 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,874
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
The treadmills are 120v, 20a.
Is 20 amps the circuit manufacturer's recommendation or is 20 amps the full load amps?
 
  #11  
Old 10-24-15, 08:57 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Ct.,USA
Posts: 3,243
Received 304 Upvotes on 269 Posts
Ray 2047
Assuming both treadmills are on at the same time, why are the 2 load currents not returning to the power source via the path of least resistance, the wire connected to neutral?
 
  #12  
Old 10-24-15, 10:13 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
All paths should be the same resistance.
 
  #13  
Old 10-24-15, 12:17 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,980
Received 196 Upvotes on 172 Posts
A multi-wire branch circuit has the hots on opposite legs of the panel. The neutral is carrying thee current back to the panel. It is the difference of current between the hots, not the sum.
 
  #14  
Old 10-24-15, 05:40 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 1,211
Received 206 Upvotes on 180 Posts
If your area uses the NEC, take note of 210.4(B) and 300.13(B).
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: