moving subpanel from outside to inside


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Old 12-11-13, 02:21 PM
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moving subpanel from outside to inside

I have a garage about 200 feet from the house. The current 100 amp subpanel at the garage is exterior mount. It's a Zinsco type panel and I want to add a bunch of circuits (got some new woodworking toys) so I decided to just replace the panel itself with one that uses regular (cheaper) breakers.

The main feed is underground and comes up into a wall between two garage doors, then runs through the attic and down into the wall where the panel is. The old panel was mounted between studs with about 1" sticking outside. It's an outside panel mounted into the exterior wall. I can't find a replacement panel that fits that neatly so I thought I would just put a new one in the same spot on the inside.

3 Questions:

1) How do I hide the massive hole in the exterior where the old panel was. The siding is an OLD t1-11 type with a very specific color stain that would be pretty hard to match.

2) Is this legal to turn the panel around. It will be pretty close to an interior corner and I read it had to be 30" clear on either side. Does a corner matter? Is there anything I am missing?

3) The old panel had the ground and neutral bonded. I am assuming in the new panel I need to seperate them and only bond the ground rod and the ground feed from the main to each other and the panel.

Thank you so much for any advice.
 
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Old 12-11-13, 03:21 PM
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1) How do I hide the massive hole in the exterior where the old panel was. The siding is an OLD t1-11 type with a very specific color stain that would be pretty hard to match.
I'm puzzled, every outside panel I have ever seen was surface mounted. Are you sure it is mounted through the wall? If so I would just get an exterior surface mount panel, patch the hole, and cover the patch with the new panel. New panel should be larger then the old one.

Is this legal to turn the panel around.
Yes.
It will be pretty close to an interior corner and I read it had to be 30" clear on either side. Does a corner matter?
It does not have to be centered in the 30" space.

The old panel had the ground and neutral bonded. I am assuming in the new panel I need to seperate them and only bond the ground rod and the ground feed from the main to each other and the panel.
Corect. Do you have four wires from the main panel.
 
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Old 12-11-13, 06:45 PM
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It's a Zinsco type panel and I want to add a bunch of circuits (got some new woodworking toys) so I decided to just replace the panel itself with one that uses regular (cheaper) breakers.
Good decision to get rid of the Zinsco and not just because of less expensive new breakers, you don't want to keep the old fire hazard panel around.

How do I hide the massive hole in the exterior where the old panel was. The siding is an OLD t1-11 type with a very specific color stain that would be pretty hard to match.
Regardless of the satin, the new siding won't match the existing 30 plus year old siding patch. I'd try to come up with something to disguise the patch such as something painted on the wall at that location or try to restain the whole building a darker color, but that may not disguise the patch either.
 
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Old 12-11-13, 06:47 PM
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This may have fallen under the 3 wire feeder exception if there was no metallic path between the structures. I am understanding this as being feed from the house panel if I read the OP correctly.

If so this would again be bonded like a service panel.
 
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Old 12-12-13, 05:51 AM
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This may have fallen under the 3 wire feeder exception if there was no metallic path between the structures. I am understanding this as being feed from the house panel if I read the OP correctly.
I thought that at first too till the OP said:

3) The old panel had the ground and neutral bonded. I am assuming in the new panel I need to seperate them and only bond the ground rod and the ground feed from the main to each other and the panel.
Then I understood the OP to mean this was indeed a 4 wire feeder.
 
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Old 12-12-13, 08:34 AM
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Thank you everybody!

There original feed is 3 #2 wires with a ground that looks like a #6 or #8. There is also a ground rod (only one) pounded in near the panel.

Also........ The main feed comes down through the wall not from an overhead mast. Because of this I thought moving the panel inside would be easier. It would look better to keep it outside because it would cover the hole. If I keep it outside, how do I bring the main lines from inside the wall to outside? Would I use something like an LNB and bring it out through the wall a few feet above the panel and then bring it in with some conduit? Remember it's coming down from the attic through the wall.

Since it's my barn / shop I was thinking of making a framed white board and hanging it over the outside hole (if I move it inside) I am sure my kids will enjoy putting pictures on my wall!

Thank you again. I appreciate all the wisdom. It's my first time posting and I think I am addicted.

Hillel
 
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Old 12-12-13, 09:33 AM
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I would look at trying a piece of flex between the panel and the conduit. An LB would need to keep the access cover permanently accessible.
 
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Old 12-12-13, 10:18 AM
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how do I bring the main lines from inside the wall to outside? Would I use something like an LNB and bring it out through the wall a few feet above the panel and then bring it in with some conduit? Remember it's coming down from the attic through the wall.
Do you have enough wire length?
 
 

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