Blown Breaker

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  #1  
Old 12-11-13, 03:56 PM
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Blown Breaker

I was replacing a outlet in my kitchen and one of the screws on the outlet hit the side of the box and tripped the breaker... so no problem..

I replaced the outlet, reset the breaker and now no power to that outlet and the one above it.
everything else in the house seems fine..
What should I check next?
 

Last edited by takaya49; 12-11-13 at 04:28 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-11-13, 04:20 PM
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My electrical detector shows power
If it is a non contact tester that is meaningless. You need to use a multimeter, preferably analog, or a test light or a solenoid tester.

Kitchen here is the keyword. Almost certainly you have a tripped GFCI. It is probably in the kitchen but could be almost anywhere.
 
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Old 12-11-13, 04:37 PM
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was replacing a outlet in my kitchen and one of the screws on the outlet hit the side of the box and tripped the breaker... so no problem..
Why are you changing outlets with the power on?
 
  #4  
Old 12-11-13, 04:49 PM
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I have no GFCI outlets in the kitchen...
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-13, 04:52 PM
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I wasnt.. the box was loose and happened to hit it before I was going to change it... Im a safe guy
 
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Old 12-11-13, 05:41 PM
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But the GFCI could be in the bathroom or basement or garage or outside or behind something that hasn't been moved in years. How old is the house? When was the wiring last updated?
 
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Old 12-11-13, 06:05 PM
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house is about 30 yo.
ive only been here 2
only 2 GFCI outlets I know if in both bathrooms.
I have a multimeter..
ive checked all outlets.. all work except this one..
 
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Old 12-11-13, 06:51 PM
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In Canada the receptacles in the kitchen were split wired across two circuits as I understand it. Are you sure both breakers are on?

A GFI cannot be split wired on two circuits.
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-13, 07:57 PM
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yes, ive checked all breakers and confirm they are on...
 
  #10  
Old 12-11-13, 08:51 PM
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yes, ive checked all breakers and confirm they are on...
Since a tripped breaker may look the same as one that's on, did you turn each breaker fully off before turning it back on?

I replaced the outlet, reset the breaker and now no power to that outlet and the one above it.
What do you mean by "the one above it"?

I was replacing a outlet in my kitchen and...
Do the new receptacle and the old one look the same? In particular, is the tab between the two brass terminal screws intact on both, or broken off on both?

I... reset the breaker and now no power to that outlet and the one above it.
Likeliest reason is a loose connection. What wires are present in the receptacle box, and how and where is each one terminated or spliced?
 
  #11  
Old 12-12-13, 03:08 PM
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Kitchen here is the keyword. Almost certainly you have a tripped GFCI. It is probably in the kitchen but could be almost anywhere.
Ray you could very well be right, but from reading the forums it seems we generally do some things differently up here. (Your Yankee custom of a GFCI in the garage feeding bathroom receptacles blows my mind.)
Kitchens are generally a 15A split plug (especially older houses) or two GFCI protected 20A outlets. I have yet to see a house with a GFCI installed somewhere other than the kitchen, yet protecting the kitchen.

OP, Do what Ray said and get a multimeter to check for voltage. And I'm going to side with Nash on this one.
You probably have a split plug, and it probably isn't on a two pole breaker. So you may be looking for two separate breakers (or two pole if it is on one). Turn it off, then back on. As Nash was saying, sometimes breakers trip internally but the handle doesn't move.
 
  #12  
Old 12-12-13, 06:02 PM
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Your Yankee custom of a GFCI in the garage feeding bathroom receptacles blows my mind
If it makes you feel any better, it blows my mind too although I know that at one time it was acceptable by code, I don't think it was ever a good practice. I wouldn't exactly call it a custom, but something that occasionally was found and not frequently. What was commonly found over 30 years ago was a single 20 amp GFCI breaker in the panel that fed both bathroom receptacles and outside receptacles, before garage, kitchen and unfinished basement receptacles were required to be GFCI protected.
 
  #13  
Old 12-12-13, 09:51 PM
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My house was built in 1987 and has the two requisite small appliance branch circuits supplied from GFCI circuit breakers. The two bathrooms each had one duplex receptacle, daisy-chained from the lone duplex receptacle in the garage all wired with #14. The garage receptacle had a GFCI receptacle with a four-plex expander plugged in and the back bathroom continued on to the sole outside receptacle on the deck.

When I used my GFCI tester in the bathroom it caused the circuit to trip and then I spent the next hour looking for the hidden GFCI. Once I found it I proceeded to replace the individual receptacle in both bathrooms with GFCI receptacles, being sure to wire the continuation from the front bathroom to the back bathroom to the incoming (line) terminals so as to create individual GFCI protected receptacles. The outside receptacle is connected to the load terminals on the back bathroom's GFCI receptacle. In the garage I eliminated the receptacle on this circuit and installed three new GFCI-protected receptacle circuits. I still need to run new 20 ampere circuits to the bathrooms and the outside receptacle and then abandon the original 15 ampere circuit.

I personally do not use any high-wattage devices on the bathroom receptacles and I rarely use the outside receptacle so I have made the retrofit a (very) low priority but someday...
 
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