What kind of phone/data connection is this?


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Old 12-26-13, 06:15 PM
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What kind of phone/data connection is this?

I have a rental unit that has a surface mounted connection on the inside that I can't quite figure out what they are.

There are two parallel cables that run under the eave and enter into each room through the exterior concrete block wall.

On the inside of the wall I have two of these, one in each room.

They are NOT regular RJ11 phone jacks. They are NOT RJ45 Ethernet cable jacks either. To make sure I took a RJ11 cable and a RJ45 cable with their plugs and tried, they don't fit. The jack is bigger than a RJ11.

I then removed the cover and looked at the inside. The incoming wire has eight strands, or four pairs?

INCOMING - brown, brown/white stripped, blue, blue/white stripped, green, green/white stripped, orange, orange/white stripped.

The jack itself has four strands - blue, blue/white stripped, orange, orange/white stripped.

Only the blue and blue/white stripped strands are connected.







Also, what's weird is the jacks (both of them) has some sort of gel in it.

Any idea what kind of cable this is? Voice? Data?

I did try and trace from under the eave to the other end to see where both cables go, but unfortunately I got it all the way to the other side of the building and they both went inside the concrete wall again to the mechanical/electrical room, and a bunch of other cables go in there too, and inside that room where the cables penetrated, is a huge metal shelving unit with a bunch of junk blocking most of the wall and I can't see what's behind unless I start moving everything out of the way.

Since it's a rental nothing is turned on right now besides electric, so there is no incoming phone, internet, cable TV etc...I am just curious what this is. My last few tenants did not need phone lines and used their cell phones exclusively.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 07:04 PM
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It is low voltage cable for sure, Cat 3 in a surface mounted box. Most cases used only for voice (plain old telephone) and/or DSL. The connectors splicing the blue and blue/white are just that, splices. The gel in them is there to keep water out.

Not really sure about the jack as I cant see it. Maybe used for security system at one time?
 
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Old 12-26-13, 07:07 PM
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Could be RJ-12 jacks which are 6 pin type jacks. Usually a 4 pin plug will work in it.
The jacks that Ma Bell uses are gel filled.

That looks like cat5 cable. Has more twists than cat3.

If it's not an RJ-45 8 pin plug then it's not for data..... most likely for voice.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 07:25 PM
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I'm pretty sure that jack was not installed by any Bell-trained person as BSP (Bell System Practices) specifically state that the jack opening must be horizontal or down to prevent it from collecting any foreign material. Nor have I ever seen any kind of gel in an interior jack. I'd replace that jack with a new RJ-11/14 rather than try to figure out what it is or was.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 08:41 PM
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OK, I guess the practical question would be...if someone wants to have a land line phone line or fax, or a DSL internet installed, and calls up the phone company, and the phone company sends out a technician to do an install, will the technician see this and say "Oh may be I can reuse this let me figure out what this is doing..." or would this person just run a new line?

If it's the latter I probably better off eliminate these jacks, push the wires back into the wall cavity and leave them alone.
 
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Old 12-26-13, 08:54 PM
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Or just do nothing at all with the existing wiring. A telephone tech would have to have access to the incoming telephone wiring that is most likely behind the shelves that you mentioned. Lacking that he/she would run new cable from some point outside the building, at an additional cost to the customer.
 
 

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