Electrical Plans for Rewiring Permit

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Old 01-01-14, 06:50 PM
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Electrical Plans for Rewiring Permit

Planning to do a rewire upgrade of knob & tube. Local municipality requires 4 copies of electrical plans. Can I just draw out a rough plan on paper?
 
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Old 01-01-14, 07:03 PM
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Local municipality requires 4 copies of electrical plans. Can I just draw out a rough plan on paper?
Ask them. .....................
 
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Old 01-01-14, 07:15 PM
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Oh yeah...you make a good point.
 
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Old 01-01-14, 07:21 PM
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I've found most municipalities allow homeowner-drawn plans for things like you're planning. My experience has shown that they basically use them for determining the cost of the permit and scope of the corresponding work. While they may do a cursory overview of your plans, the real process will begin with the inspections to ensure you're installing everything in a code-compliant way.

Of course, every location is different... so I'd go with Joe's recommendation about asking them.

You may also want to ask about their inspection requirements and whether a rough inspection is required.

Good luck, you have a fun project ahead of you!

-Mike
 
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Old 01-03-14, 10:16 PM
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thanks for the replies.

Given that this is a project that is going to take a while given time constraints, what might be the timing of inspection(s)?.

Can I request inspections be done as each circuit is completed?.

I get that it may vary by municipality, but looking for feedback from folks that may have completed similar projects.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 05:44 AM
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Due to the cost of sending the inspector out and scheduling issues I doubt you will be able to have so many inspections. Some permit feeds are based on only two or three trips to the site. This would be one rough in, a final, and possibly one for any corrections.
 
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Old 01-04-14, 11:04 AM
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Here, there is a line item on the permit for site consultation, and you would be charged that, or a reinspection fee, for each inspection necessary beyond one rough and one final per permit.

However on concealed rewiring here in an occupied dwelling, you have only a final, no rough-in. So for example when I rewired my house AND built out the upstairs as new, there was one RI inspection which served as the final for the rewiring portion and the rough-in for the upstairs. (After the upstairs was finished, there was a final for only the upstairs.)

The permitting process is not geared toward the DIYer. They may use the drawings to help determine your competence. Although that might be a mistake, they are human. They are probably used to seeing them drawn on everything from looseleaf to AutoCAD.

Depending on how accommodating they feel like being, a reasonable solution might be to do the first circuit RI and have them check that. Once they've seen that you know what you're doing, they might let you do the rest of the circuits over time and just get the final.

They have probably had others ask the same question. The risk you run is whether those in the past were competent or their worst DIY nightmare. So you have the classic 'ask permission' or 'beg forgiveness' conundrum. Have you considered paying a consulting fee to an electrician in your area who can tell you how the local inspection office functions? In my experience, you can't get that knowledge directly from all inspectors but you can get it from someone who uses that office frequently.

Also check the terms for the longest time a permit can remain open. Here, if you go over six months they will require you to get a new permit.
 
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Old 01-06-14, 07:02 AM
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I would call or go into the building office and ask. Every locale I've worked with has been helpful and willing to discuss the process with me and answer specific questions.

If it were me, I would ask them if they would just do a final inspection, since you're not opening up any walls. You'll also want to confirm what version of the NEC they follow as well as if there are any additions.

As long as you're neat, understand the codes that you need to, and do a good job, there shouldn't be anything to worry about. And don't fret if you fail your first inspection, they are there to help ensure that everything is installed safely and correctly.
 
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