Intalling 240V Dayton Single Phase Plenum Heater

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Old 01-03-14, 07:45 AM
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Intalling 240V Dayton Single Phase Plenum Heater

I'm installing a new heater in my shop. I am no electrician but i'm a do it yourself type of guy. I thought i could figure this thing out but i am stuck. the instructions for installation are horrible. Especially when you aren't an electrician.

Anyways, i have 240V single phase power that has a receptacle attached. I went to lowes and bought a plug for that receptacle rated for 250V/50 amps. i need to first make a cable to go from my heater to the receptacle. What gauge of wire should i use for about a 12 ft. run? and, does the wire need to be solid copper?

Second. once i make the cable.. it shows on my wiring diagram that i am supposed to connect one lead to J1 and one Lead to J2, and it has a connection for the ground elsewhere. How do i know which one to hook up to which?

Anything would be helpful here. I'm lost and would like to get this running soon. I'm tired of using my propane space heater and my shop smelling like propane.

Thanks guys, and girls
 
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Old 01-03-14, 08:21 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
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Welcome to the forums!

i need to first make a cable to go from my heater to the receptacle. What gauge of wire should i use for about a 12 ft. run? and, does the wire need to be solid copper?
How many watts is the heater?
Are you sure the heater is designed to be cord connected? All the ones I have wired are hard wired.
12' Is a long way to string a cord, Can you relocate the receptacle closer?

i have 240V single phase power that has a receptacle attached.
What is the size of wire and breaker feeding this receptacle?

Second. once i make the cable.. it shows on my wiring diagram that i am supposed to connect one lead to J1 and one Lead to J2, and it has a connection for the ground elsewhere. How do i know which one to hook up to which?
It doesn't matter with 240 volts.
 
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Old 01-03-14, 08:29 AM
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DAYTON Electric Fan Coil Heater,240V,1Ph,10kW - Electric Fan Coil Heaters - 2HCZ2|2HCZ2 - Grainger Industrial Supply

Her is a link to the heater that i purchased. I could remove the receptacle and hard wire in the heater. I was just trying to make it a little easier on myself. I see that may not be the possible now. I'm not sure exactly what size the wire is coming from the breaker
 
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Old 01-03-14, 08:54 AM
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I'm not sure exactly what size the wire is coming from the breaker
You are going to have to find this out to make sure the circuit can handle the load. You will need at least #6 copper wire and a 60 amp breaker/fuse. Your heater draws about 44 amps with the fan included.

Using a cord would be acceptable but I would keep it to 6' or less. A range cord would work well and would also act as a disconnect.
 
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