Problems with electricity in one room.

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  #1  
Old 01-05-14, 03:30 PM
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Problems with electricity in one room.

So i was sitting in my room, when the electricity in my room started sizzling, like the shocking sound, i got worried so i turned off the main switch for my room, a few months later i tried it on, and there we're coming sparks from the main system.

So what could be the problem? i did use a wrong adapter for my router, it has more voltage than it should have, so could that be the problem?

I would be happy if somebody could help me, i've been struggling with this a long time now.
Thanks.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:37 PM
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Welcome to the forums. This primarily a North American forum so we are a little limited in European electrical.

It sounds as if you have loose connections somewhere. What modifications have you made to the system? Is this a rental?
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:40 PM
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thank you! & Everything is the same when it was built, and no, i've bought this appartment a long time ago.
 
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Old 01-05-14, 03:52 PM
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I agree, sounds like a loose connection. This needs to be checked out ASAP.
 
  #5  
Old 01-05-14, 04:00 PM
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Where could be a loose connection? In the socket/outlet? (Dont know the name for it)
Because the lights work but that's a different circuit probably
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-14, 05:52 PM
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You could, by plugging in loads such as lamps and radios and switching the circuit off and on, determine whether some of the receptacles (I think that's the word you were searching for) are working and others some are not. That would help if the loose connection is at one of the receptacles.

But when you said
a few months later i tried it on, and there we're coming sparks from the main system,
it sounds like you're saying that turning the circuit on creates arcing at the circuit breaker in your main distribution panel that supplies and protects this circuit. If so, that's the first place I would check for a loose connection.

Are you comfortable working inside an electrical panel? If you are, we can advise you on the procedure. If not, you should probably contact a qualified electrician.

i did use a wrong adapter for my router, it has more voltage than it should have, so could that be the problem?
Doubtful, but some more details might help us determine that more accurately.

In general, plugging in an appliance that requires more voltage than the service supplies - in your case, 230V hot-to-ground - just means that that appliance won't work. Plugging one in that requires less voltage may result in a fried appliance. Neither of those outcomes should affect the house wiring, however.

For some general information to consider while we work on your specific issue, see Troubleshooting a dead receptacle or light, Basic Terminology & Other info.
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-14, 07:22 AM
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Alright, i will take a look tomorrow. And well i am learning about electricity at the moment, so yes i feel comfortable doing it as long there isn't any live wires running. oh and a quick question, does wearing leather/rubber gloves prevent you from getting shocked? i saw a video of a guy wearing gloves so i suspect it was for that particular reason, anyways thanks for helping me, i will let you if it got fixed.
 
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Old 01-06-14, 07:28 AM
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No, wearing rubber gloves keeps your hands clean. You should NEVER attempt to work on a circuit that is energized, and you should have a multimeter to help you tell whether or not it is energized.
 
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Old 01-06-14, 09:38 AM
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Heavy, thick rubber gloves can help prevent contact with power. Turning the power off will always prevent that.
 
  #10  
Old 01-06-14, 10:49 AM
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The rubber gloves need to be listed for use with the voltage and tested on a regular basis to ensure they are still safe to use. Rubber dishwashing gloves are not for protection against electric.
 
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Old 01-06-14, 11:54 AM
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In addition, you must wear leather gloves over he rubber to cut down on abrasion to the rubber. Nope playtex don't get it.
 
  #12  
Old 01-08-14, 06:02 AM
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I got it fixed ,there was a loose connection, thank you for helping everyone!
 
  #13  
Old 01-08-14, 10:56 AM
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Glad you got it done, and thanks for letting us know how it worked out.
 
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