Switching a dryer power cord

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  #1  
Old 01-09-14, 01:09 PM
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Switching a dryer power cord

I need to switch the 3 prong cord to a 4 prong. The 4 prong was on it when I got it but I didn't pay attention to how it was wired, though I do believe it was incorrect. If memory serves correctly, they had the green and white connected together and I don't think that is correct.

The 4 prong power cord has a green, black, tan and red.

Back of the dryer has a black, white and red. There is also a green screw that says electrical ground with a white wire attached.

I was under the impression black and red were hot, tan was neutral and green was ground. I was told differently by an individual at a hardware store so now I am unsure.

How should this be connected? I know the green should go to the outside ground screw but does the white wire need to be removed? No one I talked to knew what the wire on the ground was for.

Seems to be a jumper from the white wire.

For something that should be simple, I really don't want to get electrocuted.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-09-14, 01:37 PM
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The 4 prong power cord has a green, black, tan and red
Not tan,discolored white, the neutral.
I was under the impression black and red were hot, tan was neutral
Not tan just a discolored white in a very old cable.
does the white wire need to be removed?
Probably. The manual for the dryer is the best source of information. Lacking that I'd remove it from the ground screw and check for continuity to ground and continuity to neutral. If no continuity to ground disconnected but continuity to neutral move the end of the wire that was connected to the ground screw to the neutral terminal along with the cord white. Cord green goes to ground screw.
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-14, 02:39 PM
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Connect everything as its shows, black to black, white to white and red to red. Then green to the screw, removing the white.

I don't have an Ohm meter.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 02:52 PM
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Where does this white wire go? Does it go inside the dryer as if it's factory wiring? Or did it go directly to the middle terminal on the power block? If it goes inside the dryer, leave it. If it connected to the power block, take it off.
 
  #5  
Old 01-09-14, 03:21 PM
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Yes, it goes to the middle (silver) connection on the power block.

Can I just remove it from the screw and leave it or does it need to be wrapped in tape or something?
 
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Old 01-09-14, 03:31 PM
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If it's under the screw with a fork or ring terminal, or if it's just bare wire under the screw, then by all means just take it off. If it's permanently connected to the circuit board and can't be taken off without cutting, then just put a wire nut on it.

Basically 3-wire and 4-wire are exactly the same when it comes to red/black/white. The only difference is that a 3-wire does not have a separate ground, so the dryer frame is grounded through the neutral via a bonding strap (that white wire). In a 4-wire situation, there is a separate ground, so the bonding strap must be removed and the ground connected to the green wire in the cord.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 04:29 PM
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After looking again, it isn't directly connected to the middle terminal. But it is coming from the white wire that is, like a jumper.

It is connected to the green screw by way of a ring. So I'll just disconnect it and tape it off for now.

Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 04:37 PM
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Probably safer to put it on the neutral terminal then tape it if you are sure it goes to the neutral wire.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 04:45 PM
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It's a white wire connected to a white wire that is connected to the silver terminal. Not a lot of room in there but that is what I see.

Personally, I would feel safer just taping it off.
 
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Old 01-09-14, 05:51 PM
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Tape is a lst resort merhod when all else fails.
 
  #11  
Old 01-10-14, 08:39 AM
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I have no other options right now. Is taping it temporarily going to cause issues?
 
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Old 01-10-14, 09:05 AM
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No, it should be okay but you really need to find the manual on line and follow those instructions... if they are correct. I have seen instructions in on line manuals posted here that were obviously wrong. I suggest instead of keeping the make and model number of your dryer secret you post it here so maybe we can find the manual if you can't.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-10-14 at 10:40 AM.
  #13  
Old 01-10-14, 09:48 AM
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LOL. No secrets, just didn't think about it.

After looking again, there are 2 white wires coming from a sheath. One goes to the middle terminal the other to the electrical ground screw.

It is an Estate by Whirlpool. Model EED4300VQ0

I did find where it says where code prohibit grounding through a neutral, to disconnect the link and put the green ground on the screw, the white on white, etc.

It is a dryer.
 

Last edited by guiness56; 01-10-14 at 10:10 AM.
  #14  
Old 01-10-14, 10:51 AM
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The instructions say exactly what I have been saying:
The neutral ground wire is
permanently connected to the neutral conductor (white wire)
within the dryer. If the dryer is installed with a 4-wire electrical
supply connection, the neutral ground wire must be removed
from the external ground conductor screw (green screw), and
secured under the neutral terminal (center or white wire) of the
terminal block.
(Highlight added by me.)

Source: http://www.how2install.it/manuals/co...77CAB69762.pdf
 
  #15  
Old 01-10-14, 11:05 AM
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Ok. I had already done that taking your word for it.

Just haven't plugged it in yet. Some bare wire are showing around the ring terminals and I was going to tape those if it is an issue.

I already had a house fire, don't need another due to something I did.
 
  #16  
Old 01-10-14, 11:07 AM
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If the white is disconnected the timers, and lights will not work.
 
  #17  
Old 01-10-14, 11:12 AM
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How would disconnecting the white wire from the green ground screw prevent the timer and lights from working?
 
  #18  
Old 01-10-14, 11:36 AM
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Someone had said to tape the white or leave it disconnected. I was addressing this.
 
  #19  
Old 01-10-14, 12:06 PM
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Ok. Thanks.

Does the fact there are bare wires exposed beneath the ring terminal pose any issues?
 
  #20  
Old 01-10-14, 12:31 PM
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It should not be an issue.
 
  #21  
Old 01-10-14, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Someone had said to tape the white or leave it disconnected. I was addressing this.
The white wire in question is the factory supplied neutral-ground bond for 3-wire applications, not the white wire from the cord.
 
  #22  
Old 01-10-14, 06:37 PM
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Wow.....quite a thread over a power cord

The power cords use inexpensive fold over crimp terminals. A few wayward strands are not uncommon. No need to tape the terminals. If the wayward strands are long enough to touch another terminal or ground.... just trim them off.
 
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