120v from 240v line?

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  #1  
Old 01-13-14, 03:28 PM
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Question 120v from 240v line?

I'd like to put a 120v outlet in our little well house (for a small heating lamp) by tying into the existing connection that comes into the pressure switch (Pumptrol brand I believe, see photo), which I think is 240v (right?). What's the simplest way to do that? I really don't want to run a whole new line from the breaker box, etc., if I can help it. Details would be appreciated if you have time. Thanks.

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  #2  
Old 01-13-14, 03:36 PM
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You can't get 120v from there. That is a straight 240v circuit with no neutral (the white is being used as a hot - though it should be colored black to indicate that). If you want to tie into that circuit you will need to find a lamp/fixture rated to use 240v.

I assume the line going to that switch is what comes from the house? There is no other junction with a red/black/white before that?

Also FYI those wires should be wrapped clockwise around the screws, not just pinched at the edge like that. They can eventually loosen and cause a fire.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 03:42 PM
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Might be easier to find a 240V lamp and fixture if thats all you want?
 
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Old 01-13-14, 04:53 PM
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What about wiring in something like this? There are a ton of converters similar to that online. I don't have any experience with those things, maybe that's totally different, but sounds close.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 06:37 PM
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I would suggest installing a small 500 watt, 240 volt baseboard heater. Install it with a thermostat and it will only run when needed unlike the heat lamp.

Heater example: 2F500W Cadet 2.5' 500 Watt 240V Electric Baseboard Heater With Steel Construction

Thermostat example: Cadet Double-Pole Electric Baseboard-Mount Mechanical Thermostat White-BTF2W at The Home Depot
 
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Old 01-13-14, 06:50 PM
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I would suggest installing a small 500 watt, 240 volt baseboard heater. Install it with a thermostat and it will only run when needed unlike the heat lamp.
I like that suggestion. Another advantage is baseboard heaters don't burn out like heatlamps.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 07:01 PM
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Also FYI those wires should be wrapped clockwise around the screws, not just pinched at the edge like that. They can eventually loosen and cause a fire.
Not only that but is the use of what looks like 10ga crimp on terminals a good idea? I thought those connectors were for 12V type wiring only.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 07:30 PM
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Those crimps are rated for high voltage like that and are a good choice with stranded cable.

You can wrap the wires around the screw but it isn't entirely necessary as the screws have ridges on them as well as there are ridges in that plate below the wire.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 09:18 PM
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The crimps are most likely factory-installed.

I don't think with the screw heads that small that the terminal block was designed to accept the wire of that gauge (looks to be #10) straight like that. The screw head covers less than 50% of the wire's diameter, so I would not consider it acceptable. If the wire were smaller, the screw heads were larger or there was a top plate, I'd be okay with it.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 10:15 PM
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I've never had an issue with #12 or #10 straight in like that.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 05:15 AM
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I agree, Pete, bending #10 to accommodate those screws is less than successful. I have never done anything but laid the wire in the provided groove and tightened the screw securely. Crimps are a must on that larger stranded IMO.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 06:39 AM
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I have never done anything but laid the wire in the provided groove and tightened the screw securely.
I agree. That's the termination those terminals were designed for.

Not only that but is the use of what looks like 10ga crimp on terminals a good idea? I thought those connectors were for 12V type wiring only.
These are rated for 600 volt.

Gardner Bender 100-Piece Terminal Kit-TK-806 at The Home Depot
 
  #13  
Old 01-14-14, 10:15 AM
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I'm also now considering heating tape, like this. My only question about that stuff is, what if you have some left over? Can you just rewrap some pipe, roll it up, or roll it around something else to use it up?

For 120v power, for the time being I have run a long outdoor-rated power cable from the house to the little well house so I have a standard outlet in there. (Eventually I want a cable I can bury and have it permanent.) Anyway, I think I'm either going to use a lamp or heating tape to keep the pipe from freezing, and just plug it in during cold times. Any other suggestions, or things I should consider?
 
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Old 01-14-14, 10:38 AM
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Eventually I want a cable I can bury and have it permanent.
Better to replace existing 2-conductor cable with a 3 conductor cable and a subpanel at the well. Same breaker at the house should be okay for that if the pump uses less then 20 amps and the existing breaker is 30 amps.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 01:45 PM
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My only question about that stuff is, what if you have some left over? Can you just rewrap some pipe, roll it up, or roll it around something else to use it up?
If you wrap it over another piece of the same tape, it'll get too hot at that point and short out and trip the breaker....or start a small fire. Can't roll it up either. You either need to use it up on the pipe or leave a short length of it loose.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 03:20 PM
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Use a ThermoCube and light bulb. Comes on and off on the low 40s. No maintenance except ensuring the bulb is good each season. THEN you have to find the outlawed incandescent bulbs
 
  #17  
Old 01-14-14, 05:50 PM
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Rough service bulbs haven't been discontinued.
 
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