single and double circuit breaker !!

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  #1  
Old 01-17-14, 12:41 PM
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single and double circuit breaker !!

hi
here the electric is 220 volt
usually for cable (line and neutral) we use double circuit breaker


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but some electrician here use single circut breaker

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for the line conductor

and connect the neutral conductor without breaker
but directly by tape


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so what are the advantages and disadvantage of this method
 
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  #2  
Old 01-17-14, 01:16 PM
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here the electric is 220 volt
Not that it matters for this question, but I thought the electrical service in Iraq was 230V hot-to-neutral. Am I missing something?

usually for cable (line and neutral) we use double circuit breaker
If the grounded (neutral) conductor in a hot-to-neutral circuit is interrupted, the path back to the ground is interrupted. That creates a hazard. Only ungrounded (hot) conductors should be interrupted by fuses, circuit breakers or switches.

but some electrician here use single circut breaker for the line conductor and connect the neutral conductor without breaker but directly by tape
Electrical tape is not made to be used for splicing wires. Only a wire nut, split bolt, barrel connector or some other device made for that purpose should be used.
 
  #3  
Old 01-17-14, 03:38 PM
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Does your panel have two incoming hot wires (representing separate sides or legs or phases) in addition to the neutral?

Given about 220 volts hot to neutral, a system and panel with two hot legs would have anywhere from 380 to 480 volts between the two hots depending on the type of system

The two-hot system would use a double wide double breaker you have pictured to control a 440 volt (give or take) circuit or appliance. It would use the single breaker for 220 volt circuits with one hot and the neutral.
 
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Old 01-17-14, 05:42 PM
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Given about 220 volts hot to neutral, a system and panel with two hot legs would have anywhere from 380 to 480 volts between the two hots depending on the type of system
I am just going to guess it would be 415 volts. Is U.L. Listed equipment standard or necessary over there?
 
  #5  
Old 01-17-14, 09:54 PM
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sorry for my broken english
what i want to say
220-240 volt single phase
is
here we use the breaker with hot conductor only
but with neutral conductor we dont use breaker
but connect it directly
by tapes
 
  #6  
Old 01-18-14, 06:18 AM
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Both hot and neutral splices must be insulated (covered).

For splices fastened so they won't pull apart (one wire coiled around the other, or both wires twisted) and also soldered, a covering with tape is okay.

Wire nuts are the most common way of making small wire (8 and smaller gauge) splices in the U.S. Looking straight at the wire nut from the side, you should not see bare wire. Even though it can be taped, electricians consider this sloppy. If see bare wire only if you look into it (like looking up a lady's skirt), that is okay and tape is not needed.

Twisting with no solder or clamp or wire nut is not considered good enough in the U.S. even after tape is put on.
 
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