Proper way to install outlet on an island


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Old 01-21-14, 12:34 PM
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Proper way to install outlet on an island

What is the proper way to install a 1 gang outlet on an island? The cabinet is 3/4 thick.

I would normally mount the box in the cabinet flush with the inside of a cabinet and then use a mud ring through a hole. However, big box stores don't seems to sell that setup. I don't want a huge hole for a 2 gang box on the outside of the island.

Would you just cut a hole big enough for a single gang box and insert it from the outside to the inside and secure it with screws on the outside?
 
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Old 01-21-14, 12:39 PM
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I normally use an old work box screwed to the cabinet. What is your wiring method?
 
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Old 01-21-14, 12:39 PM
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How about an old work box or gangable box and Madison clips.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 01:13 PM
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There will be a whip feeding the box.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 01:15 PM
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There will be a whip feeding the box.
If metallic whip then a metal old work box or a gangable box and Madison clips.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 03:47 PM
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Use one of these puppies.
IBERVILLE | Rework Device Box Loomex 2-1/4 In. | Home Depot Canada

You can screw it to the cabinet from the front, and tighten the wings for added support in the back.
Use BX, if you use loomex you will have to build around it to enclose it.
If within 1.5M of a sink toss in a 15 or 20A GFCI (although I think yankee code says only 20A?) or a 15A split plug if not within 1.5M of a sink. Or if you enjoy making toast while you blend a smoothie at the same time, but are close to a sink, toss in a split plug on a GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 03:58 PM
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The island receptacle does require GFI protection.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:28 PM
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What is the NEC stance on kitchen split plugs?
 
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Old 01-21-14, 06:20 PM
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What is the NEC stance on kitchen split plugs?
I don't believe the NEC address split receptacles at a kitchen counter or on a kitchen island.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 06:41 PM
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To split wire a countertop receptacle you would need to run 2 cables to the box in order to keep the neutrals separate. The NEC does not disallow this.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 09:01 AM
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The island receptacle does require GFI protection.
The island has a sink and there is already 1 outlet, so there is a GFCI already on the circuit.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 04:14 PM
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I don't know if the NEC allows this but...

CEC says you can have 2 outlets per circuit. So you could just do all the above I posted, but run it off the load side of the GFCI.
Main point: use box in link, use bx.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 05:25 PM
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The NEC does not have the same limits as the CEC regarding countertop receptacles.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 06:44 PM
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I read on this site you do not have limitations on the number of receptacles on a circuit.
If this is correct, coupled with your previous post, in an american kitchen you could run a 20A circuit composed of a GFCI and lets say 9 more receptacles then?
And Joe claims the NEC does not cover kitchen split plugs, so potentially you could also install split plugs on a GFCI breaker?

(sorry to hijack the thread, learning stuff!)
 
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Old 01-22-14, 06:58 PM
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Yes to both, although I have never heard of a split kitchen receptacle south of the border.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 08:03 PM
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Thats nice. I think our rule of 2 plugs is a waste of panel space for a larger kitchen.
Thanks for the education!

(done hijacking)
 
 

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