Going from 14/2 to 14/3 for ceiling fan.

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  #1  
Old 01-21-14, 03:35 PM
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Going from 14/2 to 14/3 for ceiling fan.

So I am wanting to put a ceiling fan in an upstairs bed that didn't have one previously, just an ratty track light hooked up by a standard 14/2. I can get into the attic above the room to make everything easier but I'm not a licensed electrician but I'm not a complete idiot about all of it either. So to my knowledge this is how it would be done, I would put a weather proof junction box in the attic, run the 14/2 in and 14/3 out (white to white, black and red to black) and then just install a ceiling fan box and run the 14/3 to it? Also I believe the bedroom light that I am wanting to change to ceiling fan also has the hall light and 3 receptacles on the same 15A circuit so would adding a fan with light be an overload on that circuit?
 

Last edited by Cavy02; 01-21-14 at 03:55 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-21-14, 03:58 PM
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Power should be brought in at the switch using a two conductor cable and then a three conductor cable to a fan rated box installed in the ceiling.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:09 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

So I am wanting to put a ceiling fan in an upstairs bed that didn't have one previously, just an ratty track light hooked up by a standard 14/2.... So to my knowledge this is how it would be done, I would put a weather proof junction box in the attic run the 14/2 in and hook the 14/3 together (white to white, black and red to black) and then just install a ceiling fan box and run the 14/3 to it?
I'm a bit confused here. What are you trying to accomplish? Yes, you need to install a fan-rated box to support your fan. You need to feed that box with 3-conductor cable if and only if you intend to mount two separate hardwired controls, one for the fan motor and one for the light. Will the fan have a light on it? For all other control strategies, there's no need to replace the existing 2-conductor cable.

Also, you don't need a weatherproof box anywhere dry. There's no water getting into your attic, is there?

Also I believe the bedroom light hall light and 3 receptacles are on the same 15A circuit so would adding a fan with light be an overload on that circuit?
The bedroom light you're replacing? If that's 100% of the load that will be on that circuit, it should be fine. Many of us leave ceiling fans running all year - they don't draw a lot of power.

Turn the breaker off and see what you killed. Check everything - there's no telling how things are connected together.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:19 PM
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Ceiling Fan

If you pick up your feed in the attic you should do as Ray says and feed the switch first as code requires a neutral at switch locations. I assume you looked and there is no feed into the switch already, that you can use. The interior walls have no insulation so you should be able to drop a 3/c down from the attic to go to your switch from the new ceiling fan. If you buy a fan with a hand-held remote you will not use all three conductors, but it is a good idea to run 3/c since you never know when you may want to change switches. You do not need a weather proof rated box in the attic.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:45 PM
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Let me try to explain it a little better. The fan that I am putting up will have a light, and I'll have it on a single switch because the fan and light are both operated remotely, so I'll just leave the switch on all the time and use the remote.


Yes the bedroom light that I am replacing along with the hall light and 3 receptacles in another room are all on the same 15A breaker.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:46 PM
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If you buy a fan with a hand-held remote you will not use all three conductors, but...
If you don't have both a fan and a light you don't need 3-conductor wiring. If you have both a fan and a light in the same fixture, you don't need 3-conductor wiring unless you want to install one hardwired control for the fan and one for the light.

There are, in fact wall-mounted controls that will independently control a fan and a fan light, while using 2-conductor wiring. IOW, installing a control that includes "a hand-held remote" is one option, but it is not the only one.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:58 PM
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Okay so if I understand correctly as long as I dont plan on using two switches (one for the light and one for the fan) I can just use a 14/2?

And my logic for using a weather proof box was because I had a roof leak about a a year and and was thinking if it leaked again it would be better to have a weather proof box just in case.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 05:34 PM
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Okay so if I understand correctly as long as I dont plan on using two switches (one for the light and one for the fan) I can just use a 14/2?
That's correct. However, because fan motors need full power at startup, like any other electric motor, you should not install a simple on/off switch to control both.
 
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Old 01-21-14, 07:43 PM
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Even if its remote operated? I could understand that logic if it was like you flip the switch and both the light and fan kick on at the same time, but if its on a remote I could independently turn one on. If thats not right though, what do you recommend? Like a single switch that has both the fan and light on it?
 
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Old 01-22-14, 10:32 AM
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Are you planning to install control that has a remote transmitter as the wall switch? If so, no problem.

Are you planning to set the fan speed to "High" with the pull chain and only use the remote transmitter(s) to control the fan speed? If so, no problem.

I installed an on/off switch as a service disconnect for the fan in our bedroom when I reworked it to, among other improvements, be controlled with a couple of hand-held remotes. Then I parked my wardrobe in front of that switch so that no one could cut it off accidentally.

IOW, you can install a regular on/off switch in the wiring going to the fan, and use remote controls for the fan and light, so long as you only use the wall switch to kill the power when you need to work on the wiring above the fan.
 
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Old 01-22-14, 04:00 PM
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"IOW, you can install a regular on/off switch in the wiring going to the fan, and use remote controls for the fan and light, so long as you only use the wall switch to kill the power when you need to work on the wiring above the fan."

That is exactly what I am wanting to do. Thank you! I got the junction box and 14/2 ran in the attic and got the ceiling fan box installed. Tomorrow I'm going to pick up a fan and hopefully not burn down my house. Thanks for your replies!
 
  #12  
Old 01-22-14, 05:07 PM
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It sounds like you have it under control.
 
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