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Connecting new bb heater to existing power for a receptacle no longer needed

Connecting new bb heater to existing power for a receptacle no longer needed


  #1  
Old 01-24-14, 06:21 PM
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Connecting new bb heater to existing power for a receptacle no longer needed

I want to install a new baseboard heater in my enclosed front porch and there is a receptacle there that I don't need. Can I remove the receptacle and use the existing power to connect directly to the bb heater? The heater is a Dimplex 500w - 240v unit with an optional thermostat I installed in it. I have aThe heater will only be used for about 5 months during the colder season since I have now acquired mold in the porch area because it has no heat. Thank you for any qualified advice you could provide. Larry
 
  #2  
Old 01-24-14, 06:29 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

If that receptacle is on it's own direct circuit to the panel then you can possibly convert it to a 240v line.

If that receptacle is on a circuit with other receptacles or lights then you can not convert it to 240v to run the heater.
 
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Old 01-24-14, 06:36 PM
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Hello Larry and welcome....

How many volts is this outlet you would like to use?

If 120v you will need to run new wire to the panel if its connected to other circuits....... But I find it odd that its only 500watts and calls for 240V?
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 01-26-14 at 05:41 AM. Reason: added info....
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Old 01-24-14, 06:50 PM
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I don't know how many volts in this outlet? How can I check it?
The 500w -240v is stamped on the box but below it it reads 375w - 208v.
 
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Old 01-24-14, 07:29 PM
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Does the receptacle look like this:

Name:  receptacle.jpeg
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Old 01-24-14, 08:09 PM
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I don't know how many volts in this outlet? How can I check it?
With a multimeter - preferably an analog one.

Or you can just answer the question Ray asked.

The 500w -240v is stamped on the box but below it it reads 375w - 208v.
Yes, that is puzzling.

Originally Posted by lawrosa
If 120v you will need to run new wire to the panel.
That's not necessarily true. As PJ said earlier,
Originally Posted by PJmax
If that receptacle is on it's own direct circuit to the panel then you can possibly convert it to a 240v line.
Since your heater draws no more than 500W, the existing wire should have plenty of ampacity.

Please answer PJ's implied question: Is the receptacle you're considering on a dedicated circuit, or does it share a circuit with other loads?
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 01-24-14 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 01-24-14, 08:18 PM
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The 500w -240v is stamped on the box but below it it reads 375w - 208v.
That's actually pretty common.
It just means that if you connect the heater to 208vac you'll get 375w of heat out of it
and if you connect it to 240vac you'll get 500w of heat out of it.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 06:37 AM
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If the circuit is not dedicated and you change it to 240 volts you will let the smoke out of anything else plugged in.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 09:16 AM
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Assuming the receptacles is 120 volts, I think I'd return the heater and exchange it for a 120 volt model.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 10:52 PM
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Yes. And I have since discovered that this is one of several receptacles using the same cable. I think after reading some of these responses that I should forget about trying to connect to the receptacle since it is using old style cable maybe from the 1950's. If I try a dedicated line I would need to purchase a 20amp double pole breaker which leads me to realize I don't think I have the room on my 100 amp panel.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 10:55 PM
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Could not find one. Home Depot sell 240v variety only. And would I limit the wattage of the heater by using a 120v type?
 
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Old 01-26-14, 12:24 AM
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The wattage is the msame regardless of voltage. What changes are the amps drawn. A 240 volt unit will draw one half the amps of a 120 unit.
 
 

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