How to wire two GFCI next to each other

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  #1  
Old 01-27-14, 12:09 PM
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How to wire two GFCI next to each other

I need to expand an outlet to make room for some new items that need to be wired. Currently i have one GFCI and I want to get a new junction box that will accommodate two of them. I don't need them for outlet plugs but rather the hard wiring to them.

First off im working in a kitchen so do i have to have two GFCI's or can i wire one GFCI in front of a standard outlet box? I know code is different state to state but is it just better to use the GFCI's when dealing with kitchens and bathrooms?

My next question is about how to run them as im not to familiar with adding outlets. on the GFCI there are two sets of bottom holes, one of which brings in the power from the breaker. What are the other two for? Then from my understanding the top 2 sets are to piggy back other wires off of?

So if i want to run the two boxes the first one should get the power into it then run wires out of the top hole to the input holes on the other GFCI. Is this how it will get power?

Lastly im really confused about grounding. I read online some people say you dont need to ground them while other say you do. Some even said you only have to ground them if there are other boxes on the line that are grounded. Im using one of the blue plastic boxes that you get from lowes that does not seem to use a ground screw what is the procedure to ground on a plastic box.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 12:20 PM
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You don't need to wire in two GFCI's. Any outlet following a GFCI Wired from the load terminals are protected. Yes you need to ground them. If you have a ground wire on your power feed then you just wire to that as your ground.

The National Electrical Code has required the use of GFCI in most outdoor receptacles since 1973, bathroom circuits since 1975, garage outlets since 1978 and kitchen receptacles since 1987. In addition, the use of GFCI receptacles in crawl spaces and unfinished basements has been required since 1990. This equipment, when installed and maintained correctly, can help prevent fatal jury and many electrical fires.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 01-27-14 at 06:22 PM.
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Old 01-27-14, 12:28 PM
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I don't need them for outlet plugs but rather the hard wiring to them.
You can just wire to the load side of the receptacle. You don't need to enlarge the box.
the GFCI there are two sets of bottom holes, one of which brings in the power from the breaker. What are the other two for?
No top or bottom but there is line that is where power comes in. There is load where GFCI protected power comes out. In a usual configuration the load provides GFCI protection to the non-GFCI receptacles down stream.

On most GFCIs the connectors take two wires. This is most commonly used if you want power that is not GFCI protected. An example would be lights in a bathroom.* However best practice is if you have multiple wires is connect then to a pigtail** and pigtail to the receptacles.

A GFCI will function without a ground but best practice all circuits should be grounded. What you probably read was using a GFCI to increase personal safety when no ground is present. This sometimes done to provide 3 prong receptacles on an ungrounded circuit.

*Kitchen lights can not be on the two GFCI protected small appliance branch circuits so I use a bathroom in the above example.
**A pigtail is a 6"-8" length of wire same color and gauge as the wires it is it connected.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 12:30 PM
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ok great thanks so then all i have to do is twist together all the ground wires including the main power one and cap them?

If this is the case im thinking that i might not need to even get another box. How many piggy backs can one GFCI handle? Here is what i need to piggy back off it.

Garbage disposal
light switch
power outlet
outdoor porch light.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 12:40 PM
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Here is what i need to piggy back off it.

Garbage disposal
light switch
power outlet
outdoor porch light.
FLAG on the play. Neither of those things can be on the SABC. (counter top kitchen receptacle circuit) The GD must be on a dedicated circuit. The porch light can be on a general lighting or receptacle circuit. Neither of these require GFCI protection.

Edit: Assumes a kitchen GFCI. Bathroom, basement, or outside GFCI answer would vary slightly.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 01:23 PM
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the GFCI im referring to is underneith the counter behind the dishwash.

The porch light goes out side through the wall and up to the light

The garbage disposal gets power from this GFI then has the counter top on/off switch that shares a position with a another GFI switch
 
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Old 01-27-14, 01:24 PM
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When you say
power outlet
are you talking about a receptacle? If so, where will it be located and what will be plugged into it?

If not, what are you referring to?
 
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Old 01-27-14, 01:40 PM
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yes its a receptacle, Really sorry i don't know all the correct terms.
 
  #9  
Old 01-27-14, 02:29 PM
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yes its a receptacle,
OK, then
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
where will it be located and what will be plugged into it?
Where is the existing GFCI receptacle located?
 
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Old 01-27-14, 02:41 PM
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In addition to Nash's question:
Where is the existing GFCI receptacle located?
What did you mean when you wrote:
the GFCI im referring to is underneith the counter behind the dishwash
There should not be a GFCI under the counter for a dishwasher, just a regular receptacle. If there is is it on a dedicated circuit or on one of the counter top receptacle circuits?
 
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Old 01-27-14, 05:48 PM
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There should not be a GFCI under the counter for a dishwasher, just a regular receptacle. If there is is it on a dedicated circuit or on one of the counter top receptacle circuits?
In addition, you never want to put a GFCI receptacle behind a dishwasher where it isn't readily accessible.

This equipment, when installed and maintained correctly, can help prevent fatal jury and many electrical fires.
I'll agree with the prevention of a fatal shock injury, but I don't quite agree with a GFCI device preventing an electrical fire.
 
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