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Does a duplex receptacle count as a single or double outlet

Does a duplex receptacle count as a single or double outlet

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  #1  
Old 01-29-14, 10:53 AM
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Does a duplex receptacle count as a single or double outlet

Does a duplex receptacle count as a single or double outlet. I am trying to determine the number of outlets on a single 15 amp circuit. I have found the following guidelines from the City of Winnipeg, Canada:

The maximum over-current device permitted for lights and receptacles is 15 amperes (fuse or circuit breaker) and a maximum of 12 outlets (lights and receptacles) may be connected to each 15 ampere branch circuit.

Additionally is it recommended to mix lights and receptacles on a single circuit - I am planning to take the power from a receptacle to feed a switch/light. Does code allow this and more importantly would an inspector approve it. I plan to do this in both bedrooms in my basement development.

Thanks all in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-29-14, 11:21 AM
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Here, under the NEC, an outlet is the box where electricity may be tapped - let out. A duplex receptacle fits in one single gang device (outlet) box.

In addition, we consider it best practice to run 20A circuits for receptacles and separate 15A circuits for lighting. That way, a single fuse or circuit breaker can't put an entire room in the dark.

Can you post a link to the regulations you're looking at?
 
  #3  
Old 01-29-14, 02:54 PM
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  #4  
Old 01-29-14, 06:21 PM
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It seems strange to me that ALL lighting and receptacle circuits must be 15 amp and no mention was made of any 20 amp kitchen receptacle circuits, but receptacles can be either 15 or 20 amp.
 
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Old 01-29-14, 08:03 PM
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Thank you for the link. My eyes started to glaze over and I started to lose focus after I read these two requirements:
2. All 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles must be the tamper-resistant
type unless they are dedicated for microwaves, refrigerators,
freezers or kitchen counters or located in attics or crawlspaces.
...
4. The maximum over-current device permitted for lights
and receptacles is 15 amperes (fuse or circuit breaker) and
a maximum of 12 outlets (lights and receptacles) may be
connected to each 15 ampere branch circuit.
It makes no sense to talk about 20A receptacles on 15A circuits. It makes even less sense, with today's loads, to limit all circuits to 15A.

Then I got to this part and hung it up:
d) Kitchen counter receptacles must be of the “15A split” type, as illustrated in FIGURE 20 on page 26, or 20A T-slot.
No, I'm not interested in paying for 20A T-slot receptacles to install on a 15A circuit. And the kitchen countertop receptacle circuits are limited to 15A? Good luck with that. One good-sized microwave or toaster oven will blow one of those all bu itself.

We have one or two Canadian electricians here. Maybe one of them will stop by and help us Yankees understand this.
 
  #6  
Old 01-30-14, 03:14 AM
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The CEC limits lighting to a 15a circuit. The way I read it is that if you put lighting AND receptacles on one circuit, you are limited to 15a. If you have a receptacle ONLY circuit, you can use 12ga on a 20a circuit or 14ga on a 15a circuit. A 20a circuit must have T-slot receptacles.

Kitchen countertop circuits can be either 20a (with T-slot) or you can use a 15a split receptacle. I think given the GFCI requirements, any new work would be with a 20a circuit.
 
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Old 01-30-14, 06:37 AM
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The CEC limits lighting to a 15a circuit. The way I read it is that if you put lighting AND receptacles on one circuit, you are limited to 15a. If you have a receptacle ONLY circuit, you can use 12ga on a 20a circuit or 14ga on a 15a circuit. A 20a circuit must have T-slot receptacles.

Kitchen countertop circuits can be either 20a (with T-slot) or you can use a 15a split receptacle. I think given the GFCI requirements, any new work would be with a 20a circuit.
That is basically what I understood the CEC to say, but that isn't what the language from the link says.
 
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Old 01-30-14, 07:48 PM
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wpsteel,
According to the definitions in the CEC...
"Receptacle - one or more female contact devices, on the same yoke, installed at an outlet for the connection of one or more attachment plugs."
So yes a duplex receptacle counts as one receptacle, not two.
Also, the rule of 12 outlets on a 15A circuit comes from the rule that you can only load your breaker to 80%. Each receptacle and light is considered 1A UNLESS the load is known. For example an LED fixture known to only pull .5A will be taken as .5A instead of 1A. Receptacles can accept a variety of devices though so are always considered 1A.
And mixing lighting and receptacles is optional. I prefer not to. Find a mixed circuit in your home and try turning on the vacuum with the lights on...

Nash,
Honestly, that document makes more sense than trying to read and interpret the codebook.

- Yes every receptacle, including GFCI, must be tamper resistant unless inaccessible (ie: the fridge and microwave dedicated receptacles) OR if it is 2M above the floor.
- As fins said, you can have 20A receptacle circuits on 12AWG wire with appropriate receptacles.
- Kitchen receptacles give you options. You may put no more than two receptacles per circuit, and they can be 15A split, or 20A.
- The lighting limit is 15A in residential only. Commercial lighting circuits can be 15A or 20A.
 
  #9  
Old 01-31-14, 11:12 AM
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As fins said, you can have 20A receptacle circuits on 12AWG wire with appropriate receptacles.
The link didn't say that. Could Winnipeg have amended the CEC for their local use?
 
  #10  
Old 01-31-14, 02:58 PM
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Their wording is dumb Joe, they mention 20A receptacles, and "lights and receptacles". Residential lighting circuits are limited to 15A so if you mix "lights and receptacles" you are limited to 15A on that circuit.
However a strictly 20A receptacle circuit is ok.
 
  #11  
Old 01-31-14, 06:02 PM
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However a strictly 20A receptacle circuit is ok.
I hear what you are saying, but I am just saying the Winnipeg linked information never mentions 20 amp circuits at all, but they did mention the 20 amp devices. It just mentioned 15 amp circuits for lights and receptacles which I assume means lights and receptacles mixed on the same circuit.
 
  #12  
Old 01-31-14, 07:45 PM
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I think that is an oversight in their documentation. If they didn't allow 20A circuits I would think they would axe any mention to 20A devices.
 
  #13  
Old 02-01-14, 01:19 PM
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I think that is an oversight in their documentation. If they didn't allow 20A circuits I would think they would axe any mention to 20A devices.
With that I will agree. .................
 
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