Tapping into indoor electrical to get electrical outside

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-31-14, 06:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Tapping into indoor electrical to get electrical outside

So I am trying to get electrical to an outdoor kitchen. I had stamped concrete poured last year and had conduit run underneath the conduit to the space where the kitchen island would be. The start of the conduit is where an existing exterior outlet is now, so i was going to tap off that. But now, I realize that outlet is only 15 amps and probably wouldn't support the draw of the outdoor kitchen. Since the concrete is poured I could run conduit all along the conduit at the base of the house back to the panel, which is about 80', but I would rather not do this. The outdoor kitchen will have a small fridge, about three or four outlets, and a ceiling fan.

My second option is to tap off the dinning room outlet inside the house. It is a 20 amp circuit. The only thing is that the outlet isn't on the same side of the sliding glass door where the embedded conduit is. That means I will have to come out the stucco, down to the concrete, then across the sliding door to get to the embedded conduit. I figure I can construct one type of low enclosure than could hide the conduit for that 8' run.

I have tons of questions.

1. Is my way tapping into the dining room advisable? I am pretty sure that outlet is on the same circuit as the indoor kitchen, although I haven't checked. Will it overload?

2) should I use outdoor rated wire in the conduit, or strand wire? I know Romeo is a no-no.

3) what's the best type of conduit to use?

4) once I get wire to the outdoor kitchen, I wanted to install a three or four breaker sub panel. Is that allowed?

I wanted to research this before I poured the concrete, but my concrete contractor was pushing me I guess he needed the work.

I have a little experience with electrical, mostly relocating fixtures and adding outlets, but nothing on this scope. Any guidance is appreciated.

David
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-31-14, 07:24 AM
Geochurchi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4,070
Received 19 Votes on 19 Posts
What size conduit did you run under the slab? If I were doing that I would be running a new feed back to the house panel, can you extend the conduit up into the attic or into the basement you could change over to cable from there to the panel, Is the outdoor kitchen enclosed? There are a lot of things to consider,conduit size will determine what size conductors you will be able to run to the kitchen, the sub panel makes sense if it can be enclosed in a weather tight area, are there any spare circuits in the existing panel?
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-14, 07:32 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
My second option is to tap off the dinning room outlet inside the house
By code dinning room receptacles are restricted use for the dinning room.
I am pretty sure that outlet is on the same circuit as the indoor kitchen, although I haven't checked. Will it overload
By code the counter top kitchen receptacles are restricted use only and can't be tapped for this.
4) once I get wire to the outdoor kitchen, I wanted to install a three or four breaker sub panel. Is that allowed?
For that you need a four wire feed from your breaker box. In fact coming from your panel is probably the only way to do what you want.

Suggestion: You may want to buy the book Wiring Simplified available at Amazon and other book sellers to help you better understand what is needed.
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-14, 07:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It is 3/4 grey pvc. I am sure there is room on the panel. But I would have to cut into the stucco. The house is on a slab and its a two story. I int want conduit running up or own the wall at the panel, because its in the front yard a and I have an HOA that tickets me if I leave my garbage can out too long so I now they would make a fuss about that. I didn't get their permission to to the stamped concrete, and they threatened disciplinary action. And with the outdoor kitchen, if they decline my plans, I plan to put it on casters so it would be classified as a 'structure' and wouldn't fall under the purview of the HOA.
 
  #5  
Old 01-31-14, 08:52 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanx Ray. I figured I would need to run out to the panel for the subpanel idea. I don't really have to have that. I was on a jobsite yesterday and talked to the electrician there and he was the one who have me the idea about tapping into the dining room outlet. Either he doesn't know the code, or it is not code here where I am. Of maybe he didn't care it would violate code. I wanted to get a second opinion because he also told me that to run Romex in conduit was ok, but every where I read says that is a no no.

I am really trying to do this without going to the panel. It would be an eyesore, even if I painted the conduit the same color as the stucco. There is a forth option to tap off the outside light near the door, but then I don't know if that is the same circuit as the other 15 amp already there. I am not home now so I can't check.
 
  #6  
Old 01-31-14, 08:58 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,957
Received 33 Votes on 28 Posts
The 20 amp small appliance circuits can serve receptacles in the kitchen and dining/pantry areas. I am not sure how an outdoor kitchen would fit into that. I would guess that the inspector would look at that as a separate usage and require additional circuits.
 
  #7  
Old 01-31-14, 09:45 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
And with the outdoor kitchen, if they decline my plans, I plan to put it on casters so it would be classified as a 'structure'
That could be the answer to your electrical problems too. Just put a cord and plug on it and go to a outside receptacle. You could even use the subpanel on it you suggested. Just use a NEMA 14-30 receptacle at the breaker box if it is close enough. However I doubt you would need that much power.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: