What about low voltage vs high voltage systems.

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  #1  
Old 02-04-14, 03:50 AM
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What about low voltage vs high voltage systems.

Hey, this is a real interesting thread. I would love to know how homefield's project turned out.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/bo...-driveway.html


But, I was wondering if you guys see a benefit in the low voltage vs high voltage. I am thinking about laying the electrical myself, possibly retrofitting it into cement, by cutting groves and patching over, or having my pavers lifted and reset or a combo of both.

I also am thinking of putting this in a new stair/ walkway.

I am also thinking of laying under a gravel drive way. Is that possible?

Thanks.
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 02-04-14 at 05:53 AM.
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Old 02-04-14, 08:46 AM
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I was wondering if you guys see a benefit in the low voltage vs high voltage. I am thinking about laying the electrical myself, possibly retrofitting it into cement, by cutting groves and patching over, or having my pavers lifted and reset or a combo of both.
What are you considering high voltage? 480 volt snow melters were somewhat common in some areas 40 years ago. If you install electric snow melters, the only long term successful way is to install them in poured concrete.
 
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Old 02-05-14, 08:19 AM
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Hi Joe. I was looking at the 240 volt like vs the low volt systems with a converter.

The high volt (I guess really standard volt) like the warmly yours 120 or 240 volt
Snow Melting Systems | Driveway Heating | Deicing Solutions | WarmlyYours

or low voltage with the tuff cable I think it is about 28V after it comes out of the converter.

Tuff Cable Snow Melting Applications - Heatizon Systems

Compare Radiant Heating Systems

Also, can this stuff go under a gravel drive way or does it need to be water tight?

I am in the early stages and I do not think I can afford a newly pored driveway, with the other construction I have planed.
 
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Old 02-05-14, 08:58 AM
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Also, can this stuff go under a gravel drive way or does it need to be water tight?
You would have to consult the manufacturer about installing under gravel. Under gravel or pavers, don't expect a long life of the system. The heaters need to be totally free of movement, as in poured concrete, if you want a long term installation. I wouldn't want the heaters for myself, but I have seen a few installations from EasyHeat, they'll even help on your layout.

EasyHeat | Roof and Gutter De-icing | Pipe Freeze Protection | Snow Melting Mats | Floor Warming Cables, Mats, Thermostats | Thermal Storage Systems | Controls and Accessories
 
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Old 02-06-14, 03:43 PM
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What about using heated water in flexible piping?
 
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Old 02-06-14, 05:26 PM
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What about using heated water in flexible piping?
With a boiler and circulation pump, it would have a higher installation cost, but lower cost of operation. If I were thinking about snow melters, this is the way I'd go for a big project like a driveway.
 
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