Doorbell repalcement

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Old 02-07-14, 10:21 AM
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Post Doorbell repalcement

I need to replace an old nutone door bell. I have a 20v suplly coming to the old doorbell. Can I use this 20v supply on a new 16 or24v doorbell or do they still make a 20v doorbell? I am trying to avoid replacing the old transformer.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 10:27 AM
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This is my first visit. did your recieve my question?
 
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Old 02-07-14, 11:19 AM
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This is my first visit. did your recieve my question?
You posted when we were having or weekly beer tasting. Sorry for the delay in answering.

Doorbells are usually 7-10 volts. Was this a chime you are replacing? If you are replacing it with a chime 20 volts should be okay. The transformers are so cheaply made 20 volts is well within the expected error range for 17 volts.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 12:28 PM
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Door bell voltage

Thanks for response. the old doorbell was a 20yr old elctronic programmable one. I want to use what ever Lowes may have in a cheaper model. They all seem to be 16v. My supply from the transformer is 20v. I think they also have 24v models. All I am trying to do is not crawl under the house and replace the transformer if I don't have to.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:04 PM
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It was a 20 yr old electronic programmable digital model. It has a bad power transistor and parts are not available. So I will replace it with a regular door dhime.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:06 PM
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the old doorbell was a 20yr old elctronic programmable
Did it have batteries? Electronic chimes without batteries often use 12v DC but if you are sure it is 20 volts AC it should be fine. As said doorbells are usually 10v but I assume you mean chimes. They use ~17 volts.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:11 PM
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This was a 20yr. old electronic digital shime. It has a bad power transistor and I am going to replqce it with a cheap regular e;ectronic chime from Lowes hopefully.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:17 PM
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No, it didn't have batteries. I called nutone and asked the same question i asked you and he "OF COURSE SAID" i needed to buy a transformer with the new unit i purchase. My thought was "hey volage is voltage" why should I have to do that. Me thinks he was trying to sell a product--Ya think. thanks for the info.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:29 PM
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If the transformer isn't obviously connected (setting next to it) you need to check the voltage output of the transformer at the chime to see if it is 17 volts AC (20%) or if it is 12 volts DC just in case you are looking at an old transformer no longer connected.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:45 PM
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door bell

The measured voltage is 20v a/c. this supply line goes down in the wall and I suspect that the transformer is mounted on a floor joice in the crawl space under the house.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 01:49 PM
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I hope your didn't confuse the word transistor thinking I meant transformer. It is a power transistor on the board in the chime.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 02:30 PM
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I hope your didn't confuse the word transistor thinking I meant transformer.
No, transistor made me question even more if the voltage to it was 20 volt AC. The few electronic ones I have worked with were 12v DC.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 03:13 PM
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The model I'm replacing is an 1982 vintage. You are thinking the same as me. I feel like perhaps the model that was originally installed was a standard and the previious owner of this house(who from what renovations he had done gave away his ineptness to even think about being a handyman) installed this unit and that is probably why the unit failed, knowing his knowledge of electricity. He probably just hooked it up not thinking of the voltage requirements.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 03:52 PM
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that is probably why the unit failed, knowing his knowledge of electricity. He probably just hooked it up not thinking of the voltage requirements.
That would be my guess also.
 
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