Residential Home wiring help!


  #1  
Old 02-10-14, 01:16 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Residential Home wiring help!

Hi everyone, first time posting and i'm hoping I can get some feedback on a wiring issue i'm having. I'm installing some cabinets on a wall in my townhouse in NJ. IT will be a dry bar so no sink or anything besides a wine cooler. I need to relocate the out further along the wall and pigtail off of it to add another receptacle further up the wall. However when I pulled the outlet out of the PVC box I saw some wiring I wasn't too entirely familiar with. It has 2 neutrals running to one side of it and a hot running to the other side. There are also 2 hots and a neutral running into the PVC but all three of these wires were capped together with a wire nut. I was under the impression a neutral and a hot shouldn't even touch. The outlet is also a switched wall outlet. I've already purchased all the materials to run the extra outlet however I'm not sure where to pigtail exactly given the current layout of the wires in the PVC box. Can someone shine a little light on this setup? I also have attached a picture to best show how the wires look coming out of the wall. Thanks for your help!
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 02-10-14, 02:01 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Just because a wire is white does not mean it is a neutral. One common example is switch loops where power comes in at the receptacle or light. It is permitted to use the white of a 2-conductor cable to carry power to the switch. By code the white wire must be redesignated some color other than white, gray, or green using bands of colored tape, felt tip marker, or liquid electrical insulation but often that is not done.

Name:  Extension_FROM_SwLp_zpsdd1e0b18.jpg
Views: 2717
Size:  18.6 KB
 
  #3  
Old 02-10-14, 02:11 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the response! However when I looked inside the box there are 2 feeds of wire coming into the box. Off the to of my head I can't recall exactly which color wire from the 2nd feed is going to the outlet but then the previous owner capped off the remaining wires. I haven't seen or can't see the need for 2 feeds of wire coming into the box. So my assumption was that the wires coming into the box are true of their color.
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-14, 05:12 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,970
Received 194 Upvotes on 170 Posts
You could have a power in, a power out and a cable going the the switch.
 
  #5  
Old 02-11-14, 08:12 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I took a picture of the switch controlling power to the outlet when I got home last night. Does it seem that the power is running to the outlet and then a white and black are running to the switch? Would that mean there's a hot white wire on the outlet?
 
Attached Images  
  #6  
Old 02-11-14, 08:19 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Does it seem that the power is running to the outlet and then a white and black are running to the switch?
Yes, please see my diagram in post #2. This is the common method found and is often the case they forgot to redesignate the white some other color such as black or red. Your picture also shows a potential future failure point. The wires need to be moved from the backstabs to the screws.
 
  #7  
Old 02-11-14, 08:40 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks Ray! Is there a basic volt meter you would recommend I can pick to see which wires are the hot wires? Since i'm pigtailing off that outlet I want to make sure I wire the new outlets correctly. Also I planned on removing the switch with the backstabs as I came across a few older posts saying these eventually fail. Thanks again for the help!
 
  #8  
Old 02-11-14, 08:52 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Analog multimeters are better at "ignoring" induced voltages then a cheaap digital meter. For an analog multimeter you don't need to spend more then $8-$15. Buy just a multimeter. They sometimes come in a kit that includes a bunch of near useless junk. To determine if a wire is hot you measure between the wire and a known good ground. If you get ~120 volts it is a hot wire.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: